Quagga Research Paper

624 Words 3 Pages
The great lakes have experienced a rise in the number of harmful Alga blooms (NOAA, n.d.). Quagga and zebra increase the amount of sunlight penetrating at the bottom of the lake which promotes this growth (NOAA, n.d.). Cladophora is responsible for one particular alga bloom which grows at the bottom of the lake (NOAA, n.d.). Large piles of Cladophora can be found washed up on the shores of beaches after it dies (NOAA, n.d.). Harmful bacteria are trapped within these piles which can harm humans and wildlife (NOAA, n.d.).

A native shrimp-like organism that great lake fish have been dependent on is experiencing a dramatic reduction in populations in Lake Michigan, notably at corresponding with the invasive quagga mussel population’s expansion
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The first appearance of Zebra mussels was in Lake St. Clair in 1986 ("Zebra and quagga mussels | GLEAM," n.d.). The native habitat of zebra mussels is the Caspian Sea, Black Sea, and Azov Sea ("Zebra and quagga mussels | GLEAM," n.d.). The first appearance of Quagga mussels was in Lake Erie in 1989 ("Zebra and quagga mussels | GLEAM," n.d.). The native habitat of Quagga mussels is the Dneiper River drainage of Ukraine. In the Great Lakes Quagga mussels are a dominant invasive species ("Zebra and quagga mussels | GLEAM," n.d.). Profound impacts are experienced in the Great Lakes ecosystem due to the colonization of zebra and quagga mussels ("Zebra and quagga mussels | GLEAM," …show more content…
Water intake structures are clogged increasing maintenance cost for water treatment plants ("CISR: Quagga & Zebra Mussels," 2011). Adversely affected through large accumulations are boat hulls, anchors, and beaches ("CISR: Quagga & Zebra Mussels," 2011). Native fresh water mussels can be destroyed by Zebra and quagga mussels ("CISR: Quagga & Zebra Mussels," 2011). Native shells can be destroyed from the mussels attaching to them ("CISR: Quagga & Zebra Mussels," 2011). Another process in which native mussels are destroyed is through the overabundance of shells which drastically reduces the amount of food availability for the native species ("CISR: Quagga & Zebra Mussels," 2011). Collapse of amphipod populations which are a reliant source of food for fish has been critically effected ("CISR: Quagga & Zebra Mussels," 2011). Avian botulism outbreaks which are experienced in the Great Lakes by Zebra and quagga mussels are responsible for the death of thousands of birds ("CISR: Quagga & Zebra Mussels," 2011). Organic pollutants can accumulate in the tissues of Zebra and quagga mussels up to 300,000 times which is due to the filtered feeding habit of the muscles ("CISR: Quagga & Zebra Mussels," 2011). Water acidity is increased through high populations of Zebra and quagga mussels ("CISR: Quagga & Zebra Mussels," 2011). Once the establishment of

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