Purpose Of The Constitution Essay

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When it comes to any important historical document, there are going to many different interpretations. Everyone will be given the same text to read, but very few people will be able to completely agree as to what it means. This idea isn’t even specific to documents like the Constitution, it holds true with just about any reading. When it does come to the Constitution, the question as to what it means is as big as ever. Tribe and Dorf start off their paper talking about the purpose of the Constitution. They believe that at its very essence, the purpose is to create a balance of sorts between individual liberty and the use the government to help society accomplish everything it must. The scariest part about this, is that we must rely upon the people to run the government. History has shown that man is not always reliable, which is why the Constitution puts forth some “auxiliary precautions”. Also known as the Bill of Rights, these precautions were not something that was completely agreed upon at first. James Madison was …show more content…
The framers of the Constitution were aware of this constant change, so they made things a little vague while writing. They didn’t want to write in too specific of details, because they knew that there needed to be room for the Constitution to keep up with society. Had the framers not thought this far ahead into the future, had they only been worried about the way thing were right then, who knows what would have happened to our government by the turn of the century. I think that idea the authors are trying to get across at the start of the second half of the paper, is that we should not think of the Constitution as something that is set in stone. Yes, the rules are there and they are not changing. However, interpretations do change. The way we comprehend things changes based on things like context and personal understanding. The Constitution isn’t changing, but everything else constantly

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