Antisocial Personality Disorder In Early Childhood

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There are many theories that show that early childhood misconduct and the environment have a an effect on psychopathy and antisocial personality disorder. In the article the article the etiology of psychopathy a neuropsychological perspective by Pamela R Perez outlines the Literature that has been written over the decades on childhood’s effect on psychopathy. The article outlines the effect of attachment disorder has on the development of anti-social personality disorder. The bond we form as children to our primary caregivers is very essential to development of normal personality characteristics. Using case studies the article examines some of the family histories of known psychopaths and violent offenders. The article explains that the offenders …show more content…
Also They had an increased level of aggression over the years as they grow up even if they had low levels in early childhood.(Scharffer,2003,1020). This an a good example that shows how ANTI SOICAL PERSONLITY DISORDER clients develop antisocial tendencies and how they can predict ANTI SOICAL PERSONLITY DISORDER in children that will eventually be adult criminals. So that brings me to the question how do people who are psychopaths and anti soical personlity disorder function in prison and in the court system In the article antisocial personality disorder: Predictive validity in a prison sample By Eden’s Et all. People diagnosed with ANTI SOICAL PERSONLITY DISORDER are frequently brought into the legal system and are thought to be a risk in the prison system. The research presented in this article examines the validity of the real risk The research examines that if someone who meets the criteria for anti soical personlity disorder has any Bering if the will do future misconduct once in prison. The article also examines the probably of violet behavior coming from newly admitted inmates in prison. The article examines multiple prisoners who met the criteria for ANTI SOICAL PERSONLITY DISORDER according to the DSM-IV using structured interviews to diagnosis them and at the time these prisoners were enrolled in …show more content…
The results of the study show that a diagnosis of ANTI SOICAL PERSONLITY DISORDER with adult symptom has no effect on prison behavior of those with a diagnosis. The often used forensic psychological testimony that people with ANTI SOICAL PERSONLITY DISORDER while pose a dangerous threat even when in prison is completely false. (Edens, 2015,123) ANTI SOICAL PERSONLITY DISORDER As with other personality and mental disorders there is a high amount of co morbidity with other mental illness. All the articles that I found say the same thing in their research with ANTI SOICAL PERSONLITY DISORDER and what it is co morbid with. In the article the etiology of psychopathy a neuropsychological perspective by Pamela R Perez explains that the highest chance of co morbid disorders with psychopathy and ANTI SOICAL PERSONLITY DISORDER are impulse control disorders and other personality disorders. Impulse control disorders include substance abuse disorders, Gambling disorders and kleptomania. This is partially the reason why many people with ANTI SOICAL PERSONLITY DISORDER are criminals is due to the fact that it is so common to be co morbid with substance abuse disorders which can lead to criminal

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