Five Stages Of Psychotherapy

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Psychotherapy is a common term that is used to illustrate the process of treating psychological disorders and mental illness (Cherry, 2015). Specifically, Moreno’s psychodrama therapy is a type of group psychotherapy, which aims to ameliorate participants’ social communications skills, re-build their self-assurance, and enable them to express their positive and negative emotions in a safe and supportive environment (Blatner, 1988; Wilkins, 1999). According to Yehoshua and Chung (2013), there are three fundamental stages in the process of classical psychodrama therapy; namely, the warm-up stage, the action stage, and the sharing stage (refer to Figure 1 in Appendix 1). Apart from that, the five components those are essential throughout the …show more content…
The primary aim of this stage is to help participants in bringing out their underlying thoughts, behaviors, and emotions of which they are not fully conscious (Corey, 2008). According to Yehoshua & Chung (2013), the first step in this phase turn up when the protagonist and the director discuss and select the subject to be dramatized, initiate the first scene (present scene), and determine the commencing point of at least three succeeding scenes such as the past scene and the surplus scenes. Secondly, the director reiterates the aroused issue to remind the protagonist and other group members in the first few minutes of the psychodrama therapy (Wilkins, 1999). Thirdly, the director requests the protagonist to create an imagination of the stage by recalling the picture of the scene, which consists of the sights, sounds and scents. Then, Wilkins (1999) stated that the director will assist the protagonist to set up the physical elements or stage in the scene by using the objects that can be found around the setting such as the furniture. Once the scene had been set up, the protagonist is requested to select some of the group members to become the auxiliaries, although the selected group members might be declining e the request from the protagonist if they are unprepared to become the auxiliaries (Yehoshua & Chung, 2013). Next, the theme of the scene and the characters of each selected auxiliary are explained by the …show more content…
Besides, this technique is also used to deepen the protagonist’s warm-up. Once all the auxiliaries are acquainted with their characters, the director then uses the mirroring technique to swap the protagonist’s role by choosing a suitable auxiliary. At this point, the protagonist is withdrawn from the psychodrama process to watch the scene played by other auxiliaries (Wilkins, 1999). Blatner (1988) stated that, the mirroring technique is useful for the protagonist to be the viewer of the subject and gain insights from the scene. After completing the first scene, the director and protagonist form the second scene which is the past scene, where the protagonist and the auxiliaries portray a past personal issue of the protagonist. Concurrently, both the protagonist and the auxiliaries undergo the same process as in the first scene. The psychodrama therapy continues, and the protagonist and the auxiliaries re-experience the same process with different issue from different times, people, objects and places (Wilkins,

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