Sigmund Freud, Jung And Laing: A Psychological Analysis

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The neurological model is the predominant view of mental functioning in modern times. Whatever the causes for this attitude, valuable approaches towards the mind have been abandoned. Despite differing in distinct ways, these philosophical psychologies agree that the neurological approach is too reductive. Several important aspects of the mind are left out in the neurological approach. This paper will analyze the psychological views of Freud, Jung and Laing. Their views on the nature of the mind, then nature of mental illness and the preferred method of treatment will be compared and contrasted.

The first basis of Freud 's belief system is found in the existence of the personal unconscious. The mind is a substance that
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Repression is when a thought is removed from the conscious mind and put into the unconscious mind. The conscious mind is not capable of dealing with these thoughts as they are harmful to itself and to society; they are then placed into the unconscious. The process of repression is therefore largely beneficial as it takes away harmful material. Repression is a largely beneficial method for dealing with these desires.

The problem with repression arises when the unconscious material still has an influence on one 's behavior. Repression can overstep its bounds and remove an unresolved issue. The problem does not simply go away when it is in the unconscious because the unconscious is still quite active and dynamic. This mistaken repression manifests itself in the form of mental illness. To Freud, this repression can have a negative aspect to
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This process is known as individuation. This process occurs when one is strong enough to take in the unconscious material, without being victim to psychic inflation. This process takes us away from petty, egotistic problems and allows the unconscious material to be expressed in a universal way. The individuated person is an individual in the truest sense of the term and exists independently of social role. This process of individuation comes with an increased overall sense of well-being and purpose. Individuation is the main goal of Jungian psychology.

Although Jungian psychotherapy can deal with health issues, the main goal is individuation. Much like the Freudian approach, the therapist is a guide to the patient. Unlike the Freudian approach, there is emphasis beyond medical purposes. The analyst helps the patient discover the problems themselves. Eventually, the patient is to be given the tools to deal with the process themselves. This relationship is enhanced by a strong emotional bond between the two. The fulcrum of Jungian psychoanalysis is the process of individuation and

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