Psychological Impacts Of Psychological Warfare

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Psychological impacts are more than the hubris previously mentioned. Those in positions of power have the capability to rule with psychological warfare. Dean Cheng a specialist in China’s military and foreign policy writes that “The ultimate proof of generalship… is the ability to defeat an opponent without fighting.” This was done long before the advancement of technological advancements by attacking an enemy’s psychological will to resist. Today China attempts to mold perceptions worldwide. The political warfare has massive potential “to constrain and restrict an opponent’s ability to wage war.” This can be accomplished through various means. Recent sanctions are evidence of the principle in action. Major states attempted to prohibit Iran’s …show more content…
Cheng also mentions that “Perhaps the most important future battlefield for psychological warfare, though, is the Internet.” This is precisely why China and Russia are taking advantage of the opportunity; in the minds of some it is the best place for psychological warfare. Another notable factor is social media. It plays a major factor in terrorism. Islamic forces use it as means to push Jihadist belief systems onto those around the world. This directly results in various acts of terrorism across the globe. It has reached the point where Twitter has in essence declared war on the ISIS. Psychological warfare intimidates are coerces populations to various ends. These ends are more than mental shifts or religious beliefs; the results can be very physical. The potential has epic proportions; whether it be good or bad, psychological warfare has played a part in years and will continue to be growing factor in years to …show more content…
From the Rome to North Korea patterns for success and failure are readily available to the historian. Two major countries are subject to massive change in the not the too distant future. A few economists believe that the year 2016 will see the fall of the Peoples Republic of China. Gordon G. Chang writes for The National Interest that “the country’s extraordinary economic difficulties will result in a collapse long-term decline… [meaning the] return to the ranks of weak states.” Various economic factors from manufacturing and consumption patterns are point in the downward direction. Economic stimulus is failing. The “economy has never made sense.” Chinese economic action can be summed up as murky as best. It is following the patterns of previously mentioned nations that fail; the state itself is not supporting itself; hope is gone for the nation that rose so rapidly when their policies do not promote continued growth. Secondly, the United States of America could benefit by looking into the past for resolving issues of the past. The United States has the potential for failure because of domestic reasons. It almost analogous to Rome. Rome “suffered an absolute decline in its society, economy, and institutions that left it unable to protect itself…. Rome rotted from within” (Nye). Abraham Lincoln is often quoted for his aphorism “A house divided itself cannot

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