Sexual Abuse Effects

893 Words 4 Pages
More often than not, disclosing the truth about their traumatizing experiences can be just as damaging as the sexual abuse itself. Victims of sexual abuse are afraid of the consequences that may arise once the truth of the abuse has been revealed. This fear is what causes them to refuse help from professionals, professionals that are trained specifically to help with this type of abuse. They are afraid that once they feel comfortable enough to admit the truth, the reactions would be of humiliation and disbelief. “A disclosure that is met with a dismissive, disbelieving, nonsupportive, [sic] hostile, or nonprotective [sic] response can be traumatic in itself and lead to long-term mental health symptoms” (O’Leary, Coohey, and Easton 277) If …show more content…
“However, childhood sexual abuse can also have lasting, serious and wide-ranging effects survivors are often overloaded with shame and humiliation, and lacking in self-confidence. Every survivor is unique and so are the processes by which people heal.” (Tong, Gillespie 556). Not only do they fear humiliation, but most victims also feel a multitude of insecurities about themselves. Shame was another reoccurring side affect of sexual abuse. “Shame, fear, and confusion may surround the sexual abuse experience and explain why some children do not tell. These feelings may be intensified by the abuser’s threats and actions to silence the child” ( O’Leary, Coohey, and Easton 277). This quote helps others to have a little understanding on how difficult it must be for a child to have to decide if telling people the truth is worth its consequences. One example may be that a child was sexually abuse by its father. If word got out about what he has done to his child, it is a possibility that the father will be forced leave the child forever. Even though the abuse will desist, the child’s life will still be changed forever. Thus, leaving the child with the dilemma of wondering if “my safety is worth loosing my …show more content…
. A shocking point included that these victims might actually have some benefits from being sexually abused as children. Lauren Drerup Stokes, David McCord, and Lydia Aydlett conducted a study that included two groups of people; one group had experiences with sexual abuse, while the other group did not have such experiences. It was found in their research that abused victims “tended to be more worrisome, emotional, nervous and insecure than non abused individuals (Drerup, McCord, Aydlett 671). Although these victims seem to have similar affects of the victims previously researched. This group had a unique trait that was not found in the other

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