Psychological Effects Of Procrastination

942 Words 4 Pages
Do you have something you’re putting off right now? A task that you’re feeling highly reluctant to start, let alone finish? We have all been guilty of it at one time or another; We have been victims of procrastinating, especially as students. Procrastination is defined as “putting off or delaying, especially something requiring immediate attention” (Harper, 2015). This can include putting off assignments, papers, and projects. As you can imagine, the outcome of doing this is always negative. Procrastinating not only has psychological effects, such as stress, anxiety, and depression, but it additionally takes a toll on your body. Students who procrastinate reported to having compromised immune systems, gastrointestinal issues, and insomnia. …show more content…
Mentally, procrastinating can cause you to have low self-esteem, obsessive thinking, and perfectionism. The emotions that come with those mental aspects are frustration, guilt, anxiety, depression, and anger. If these symptoms are prolonged, your mental health can be damaged. Some physical effects of procrastinating are: raised blood pressure, headaches, restlessness, and trouble sleeping. Having prolonged physical symptoms like high blood pressure can cause heart disease. Procrastinating can have ramifications on relationships as well. The tension brought on by putting off your work can translate into relationships by causing frustration, nagging, and accusations. You may also become so preoccupied with your own symptoms that you neglect the people around you entirely (Perry, 2011). Additionally, you feel the need to distance yourself from others. Helplessness and loneliness result from this withdrawal. These destructive repercussions seem to go around in a circle. These are all reasons why students should learn to manage their work and …show more content…
Putting work off until the last minute can be pattern deeply ingrained. Although it is difficult to break the habit, it’s not impossible. Being optimistic in your thinking can take you a long way. You can start by telling yourself the positives of not putting off your work. Mentally remind yourself that you will avoid stress, have extra time to perfect your work, and you will be able to relax and have free time later. This positive self-talk will boost your motivation to start sooner. Following that, you should make a plan and create goals. Write these goals down. It is shown that you have an 80% higher chance of achieving your goals if they are put down on paper (Marano, 2003). Then you must carry out the idea. Start the assignment the day it’s assigned, or use the previously discussed method of planning. If you use these tips consistently, you will eventually replace your distressing habit with healthy

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