Essay On The Effects Of The Great Depression On Family

789 Words 4 Pages
The Great Depression affected millions of people in America; families were falling apart and some families could not even afford to get divorced (Batchelor). It was a huge economic decline in America. The Great Depression had huge impact containing psychological, physical , family and home life, and social impacts. The Great Depression created psychological and physical impacts. People felt shame, especially men. Working citizens in America were forced to live off of welfare programs and private charities to support their families. This was shameful to those who really did work and worked hard to have success. They carried large burdens because that had become unwilling participants of the economic breakdown; there was nothing they could …show more content…
The Great Depression impacted Family and home life in numerous ways. Family life was no longer the same it often failed. Marriage rates declined because people could no longer afford to get married along with divorce rates people could no longer afford a divorce (Bryson). Some men even just completely deserted their children and families. (Bryson). Child abuse and domestic violence rates raised. Tension increased because of the dispute over basic needs which drove people to anger resulting in child abuse and domestic violence (Batchelor). Children also suffered malnutrition because families could not afford the food to supply their kids with the proper nutrients, kids also rarely had clothes that fit during this time …show more content…
Social effects were a great aspect to The Great Depression. Every piece of improvement in society for women was thrown away almost completely. WPA discriminated against women giving them way less rights than men. WPA was a work program for unemployed citizens to get jobs (Bryson). All prosperity for women was thrown in the garbage can during this time. Women's rights were taken away such as right to vote and have a voice in society (Alchin). This era contained great amounts of optimism, exuberance, and invincibility for women because as their rights were taken they showed that they could fight for them back and eventually receive them back

Related Documents