Psychoanalyticism In Catcher In The Rye

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J.D Salinger’s novel, Catcher In The Rye is about a teen, Holden Caulfield, the protagonist of the narrative. Holden is full of unique problems and most of the time lost in his own world, that can’t face reality. The psychoanalytic theory arranges a lens of definition when working at Holden Caulfield. Holden is seen as a lonely, rebellious teen who flunked out of an all-boys private school, Pencey Prep. Failing school exemplifies how Holden controls his own decisions in the real world. As stubborn Holden is, opening up his persona and experiences to people is very hard for him, “I’ll just tell you about this madman stuff that happened to me…” (Salinger 1). From a Freudian psychoanalytical perspective, Holden would seem to keep all his thoughts …show more content…
In the narrative, Holden is in detail explaining to his psychiatrist about his days after he flunked Pencey Prep. Holden was always alone that now reveals what kind of teenager he is. “If you want to know the truth, I don 't know what I think about it. I 'm sorry I told so many people about it. About all I know is, I sort of miss everybody I told about. Even old Stradlater and Ackley, for instance. I think I even miss that goddam Maurice. It 's funny. Don 't ever tell anybody anything. If you do, you start missing everybody.” (Salinger 214). This quote alludes to how Holden lives in such pain. Being close to his brother and watching him die to describe how he can’t bear to open up to anyone ever again, because having the thought of loss or losing something means a lot to him. Sharing something important in your life to someone means opening up to them, but Holden didn’t advise. The closeness and trust that is involved will show that Holden doesn’t have this closeness or trust with others. According to Freud’s structure of the mind, one of the three levels that Holden’s mind consists of is preconscious. “The preconscious holds the information we’ve stored from past experience or learning. This information can be retrieved from memory and brought into awareness at any time.” (Nevid 469). The citation relates to Holden clearly because it is a fact that he’s always alone. There is so much pain that Holden …show more content…
Holden’s bizarre behavior that seems so unattached to the moment would reflect a psychological state attached to his unconscious self which is the Superego. The Superego, according to Freud, is the last part of the mind to develop. It constantly strives for perfection, even though this perfection ideal may be quite far from reality or possibility. J.D Salinger, himself had an immature relationship with women. He has dated many women, married a couple of them, and divorced a few as well. It emphasizes Salinger and Holden can relate to each other with this subject. From a biography, it is said, that Salinger has married 5 women and lasted his last relationship until his death. Furthermore, it also focuses on why one of his relationships didn’t work. “Despite Salinger’s best efforts, not all of his life remained private. In 1966, Claire Douglas sued for divorce, reporting that if the relationship continued it ‘would seriously injure her health and endanger her reason.” (The Biography Channel website). It is immature for J.D Salinger, a grown man can’t stay in a stable relationship. Holden who is only a teen has also had immature relationships with women. For example, “They didn’t invite me to sit down at their table - mostly because they were too ignorant - but I sat down anyway. The blonde I’ve been dancing with’s name was Bernice something - Crabs or Krebs. The two ugly ones’

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