Pros And Cons Of Vaccines

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Vaccines: Protecting the Community, One Person at a Time “According to Shot@Life, a United Nations Foundation partner organization, vaccines save 2.5 million children from preventable diseases every year, which equates to roughly 285 children saved every hour” (ProCon.org). That’s a lot of kids, and we aren’t just talking about chickenpox. We’re talking about every disease out there that can be prevented by vaccine, many of which are deadly. If we did not have vaccines available, 2.5 million children each year could potentially contract a life-threatening illness, and many would die. No one wants to see their child taken from them, or even hear of the death of a child down the street. However, we don’t have to worry about this because …show more content…
The term “artificial” is used because a person receives a modified or weakened form of a virus or bacteria. Natural immunity comes from being exposed to an actual disease causing strain. There are two types of vaccines: inactivated vaccines and live attenuated vaccines. Inactivated vaccines are made up of a virus or bacteria that has been completely killed or inactivated. These vaccines are completely incapable of causing sickness, but as a result, they cause a relatively weak immune reaction. People receiving a vaccine of this nature will usually need several booster shots over time. An example of this type of vaccine is the flu shot. Live attenuated vaccines contain a live, but weakened, bacteria or virus that has been grown under special lab conditions. These vaccines trigger a stronger immune reaction than inactivated vaccines, so only one booster is needed. These vaccines can sometimes cause illness, but it’s very rare. As a result, doctors will not give vaccinations of this nature to pregnant women or people with weak immune …show more content…
In order to understand how vaccinations protect us from disease, one must first understand how the immune system works. The immune system is what protects our bodies from disease and other harmful invaders. This complex system uses its network of cells, tissues, and proteins to identify foreign invaders and destroy them. It is also capable of remembering past invaders, and will prevent them from invading again. The body is able to identify foreign substances because they have something on them called antigens. Antigens are special markers that trigger an immune reaction in the body. When a foreign substance enters the body, it triggers the production of molecules called antibodies. Antibodies are produced in the lymph nodes as well as bone marrow, and are then carried through the bloodstream to bind to invaders and destroy them. Each antigen requires a specific antibody. There are also two types of white blood cells, known as lymphocytes, that play an important role in understanding how vaccines work. They are the B and T cells, and their purpose is to act as lookout cells. Whenever these cells are used, some of them may become memory cells. These special cells are able to recognize previous invaders, and will destroy them before they even have a chance to infect their host. When a person is vaccinated, the immune reaction explained above is activated. The body goes through the entire process as if it really were in danger. A good way

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