The Unemployment Compensation Program

2227 Words 9 Pages
“The idea that community or faith based charity were more efficient, effective and capable than the government of addressing ecological stringency hasn’t been true since the industrial revolution transformed the US from agrarian to an urban nation” (LA Times). When I was 14 years old, my mother, brother and I were evicted from my mothers then boyfriend’s house and forced to share a one bedroom apartment with no furniture. I would drink water to feel full and when we did get groceries, we would shop at the Dollar Tree, living off of canned food and preservative filled junk. My mother didnt want to enroll for any government programs. If she had, my brother and I definitely would have lived a more happy and healthy childhood. I’m certain that …show more content…
It simply isn’t a priority and doesn’t increase anyone 's profit. In “Why is Poverty Moving to Americas Suburbs”, hopes of securing an extension of unemployment benefits for 1.3 million long term jobs Americans took a blow. . . when Congress was unable to reach an agreed regulation for the Unemployment Compensation Program. Although there is still a chance that the program will resolve- the earliest that Congress will revisit the legislation is at the end of January. When I was 18, I worked at a taqueria and an ice cream shop. I eventually found myself working less and less hours for minimum wage. The harsh reality is that managers don’t want to risk paying anyone overtime. The better option would be to hire dozens of workers all for four hours a week for eight dollars a day. If I were to have been kicked out of my familys house there would be absolutely no chance of survival. And one should take into account the different situations that a common citizen could get himself into. If one worked three minimum wage jobs that would give an average monthly salary of 1440$ after taxes, which is barely enough for a one bedroom, utilities and food. That estimate does not include funds for gas, insurance, savings, credit, luxuries, education, medication, dependants and any emergency money that one might and would most likely need. That would also leave one with six …show more content…
He highlights the inefficiency of privatization from a health care workers point of view. “In Massachusett, 14 health maintenance organizations cover 45 percent of the population, one of the highest rates of any state, and in surveys, consumers rank some H.MO. among the nations best. But with a surge of consolidation of hospitals and health services in the pat two year, and the recent arrival of invester- owned hospital corporations in the state, many doctors say they have come under relentless pressure to subordinate patients interests to those of accountants and stockholders” (Kilborn 49). Dr Bernard Town (76), chairman of Ad Hoc Committee to Defend Health care believes “It’s time to put a stop to it”. He truly believes that the corporate presence can jeopardize authority, jobs, income and patient care. Dr Ann Hallward (32) just beginning her internship in psychiatry shares many of the committees idealism. “The opportunity to help someone when they’re vulnerable- that’s a wonderful thing to be able to do with your life. . . If getting rich is not an incentive to enter medecine. . . If medicine attracts a different group of people, I think that’s good” (Kilborn

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