Pros And Cons Of Portal Fantasy

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Portals in literature have made it possible to enter many magical or fantastical lands. Indeed, there are many different places in the world of literature that we on solid Earth have been able to explore. Not by ourselves, but accompanied by one or more fictional characters and their adventures shared through the written word. Using the literary works of: “Alice in Wonderland” by Lewis Carroll, “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz” by Frank Baum, “His Dark Materials: The Subtle Knife” by Philip Pullman, “Reckless” by Cornelia Funke, and also by Funke “Inkheart.” I intend to delve into the history and meaning behind how and why they work.
ROOTS OF PORTALS In 1858, George MacDonald wrote “Phantases.” Upon which it was thought that Carroll grounded
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That is only when the idea of portal fantasy began to take effect, and be classified as a subgenre of fantasy. On the contrary, people have been travelling to other worlds and universes, since they were able to think. Asking themselves questions such as: “What if a place like … existed?”, “What would I do if I went there?”, “What else would go on there?” and so on and so forth. Maybe because they are making up a story for their child, or maybe because they’re unhappy with their current life and imagine a brighter place elsewhere, or maybe they are just wondering about that great wide chasm of space out there and asking themselves, “Could we really be …show more content…
For instance the simplest one to explain might be the mirror used in “Reckless,” the mirror transports you to Mirrorworld when you touch it with your hand. However, this particular novel reverses the norm for a piece of portal fantasy, our protagonist would rather stay in the world behind the mirror than live in his own. Taking “Inkheart” now, also by Funke, which uses the unconventional portal of the spoken word by a ‘Silvertongue’ to enter and exit the world inside the book. However this can be somewhat risky and works better with a more skilled silvertongue. It’s the kind of portal that would make any child think it was possible by anyone. Another of the simpler types of portals, is the portal key used in “The Subtle Knife”, the knife itself. A portal key being the reason for the opening of a portal and giving the writer infinite possibilities for new worlds. Though this knife is particular about its holder and an unworthy or uninstructed user would not be capable of opening a

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