Pros And Cons Of Mental Health

Great Essays
Sarah Farmer
POLICY BRIEF # 3
THE EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This policy brief will address the concerns with diagnosing and labelling individuals with mental illness. It will discuss how this problem effects involuntary treatment for the mentally ill as many states have issues defining mental illness clearly and concisely. This brief will discuss one possible option to involuntary treatment for the mentally ill and the pros and cons of this option.
THE STATEMENT OF THE ISSUE The mentally ill should be subject to involuntary treatment.
THE BACKGROUND The problem with the mentally ill being subject to involuntary treatment lies within the labelling of mental illness itself. Each state sets its own legal definition of "mental health" and "insanity"
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Often times those that are forced to receive treatment (such as with Baker Acts) form a mistrust for the helping professional. This can lead to a refusal of services in the future they may have otherwise accepted. Those under Baker Acts generally feel they are “imprisoned” even though they have not broken any law. In addition, the mentally ill are commonly appointed a guardian. This can be a good or bad thing as there are concerns of caregivers/guardians abusing their power. An advantage to involuntary treatment is that those who truly need treatment, but would not otherwise accept it for themselves, can get help for their disorder. Often times, people with psychology disorders go untreated due to never having been diagnosed because they have refused treatment. Often the untreated mentally ill engage in criminal activity, self-neglect and can pose concerns for public safety. Involuntarily treatment can get individuals diagnosed so that they can get the appropriate medications and/or therapy. Diagnoses are necessary for insurance purposes and open the door to services and referrals. In addition, outpatient therapy is less invasive than inpatient therapy. You are not forced out of your home and into a hospital. Outpatient therapy also offers individuals the opportunity to stay in their current environment and practice techniques that will help an individual cope with their disorder and adapt successfully in their

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