Pros And Cons Of Inclusion In The Classroom

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As many teachers, educators and parents have their own opinions on the subject of inclusion in a classroom, there are also many pros and cons that exist. Inclusion is when students with disabilities spend their classroom time alongside their peers in the general education classroom for most, if not all, of the day. When inclusion is brought to an educator’s attention, some believe that they cannot teach effectively with an inclusive classroom (Cassady, 2011), while others believe that separated classrooms are inefficient for the student’s progress of learning (Thompkins and Deloney, 1995). Although having an inclusive classroom may be tiring and frustrating for the general education teacher, it can benefit the student by allowing them to grow …show more content…
There is an old saying that goes, ‘monkey see, monkey do’. When educators treat students with disabilities the same way they treat students without disabilities, acceptance is easier because it seems like second nature to all participants in the classroom. According to Cassady, “It is important to identify teachers’ attitudes toward inclusion because it can dramatically affect their performance and the success of children with disabilities in the classroom” (2011). As long as educators treat every student with the same respect and discipline, the classroom can become a place where children can come and feel like they belong there, rather than being singled out. Better feedback from the students comes included in an inclusion classroom, of course after some time. It has been found that students who are able to be in the general education classrooms along with their peers, have more interaction with their teacher and even though the feedback was minimal, it was more constructive feedback instead of things like ‘good job’ (Hocutt, 1996). Not only is the feedback increased, but the grades as well. According to Madden & Slavin, “TAI [Team Assisted Learning] was found to significantly increase the achievement of academically handicapped students” …show more content…
Students may also experience the con of not being given anything to do in the classroom, even when it comes to the teacher giving out assignments (Madden & Slavin, 1983). Dumbed down lessons and/or assignments are a way that teachers can make sure the lesson is fit for everyone. However, if the students are placed in an inclusive classroom, they need to be taught what all general education students are learning with the exception of possibly needing modifications or accommodations. An alternative instructional method that is used to help not dumb down lessons, is using class wide modifications instead of individualized modification (Hocutt, 1996). Some teachers feel that they cannot efficiently teach students with disabilities who are in inclusive classrooms and end up giving them nothing to do during class time. According to Madden & Slavin, it isn’t uncommon to see a teacher teach a lesson while the one child who has a disability in the inclusive classroom sit in the back of the classroom coloring or having nothing to do with the class (1983). While upsetting to the students, it also brings on the idea that students with disabilities can sit back and do nothing while still continuing onto the next grade with the same knowledge as the prior year. Cassady states that “when general education teachers have negative attitudes toward inclusion … they may not provide the necessary supports that

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