Assisted Suicide And Euthanasia Essay

1015 Words 5 Pages
Modern day technology is evolving constantly for purposes of expanding knowledge and making life more comfortable. Medicine is one of the few phenomena that has aided in the world population’s health and made the future of science and disease less vulnerable. Up to this day, there are a variety of treatments available to heal a person with diseases such as the fever, small pox, or some forms of cancer. Other miraculous technologies and procedures have been created too such as assisted suicide, in which it was described in “Euthanasia And Physician-Assisted Suicide In Dementia: A Qualitative Study Of The Views Of Former Dementia Carers,” “a doctor intentionally kills a person by administration of drugs” or “a doctor helps a person to commit …show more content…
Interviews and surveys asked about the reasons for supporting or rejecting assisted suicide. The study stated, “Some participants said that assisted dying went against the principles of care [...] concerns were also raised about the ‘risk of abuse’ should assisted dying be legalized for dementia” (Tomlinsin and others). On the contrary, this study also stated, “Typically, participants believed that it is the individual’s right to determine their own death.[...] over half would want the option of an assisted death for themselves. They suggested having this option would bring comfort and control.” as reasons for assisted suicide (Tomlinsin and others). The frame instilled from this case suggests that either individuals are for assisted suicide because personal freedom is a matter or against for reasons of unethical issues and that full exercise of this freedom would go out of hand. It also may indicate that individuals feel that the option is a comfortable way of ending their …show more content…
There has been instability with the assisted suicide topic because the situation has been left unsettled. But, to imagine if the law universally legalized assisted death permanently is to think there is a possible solution to quiet down the questioning. Otherwise, conditions could worsen with legalization. As Neil M. Gorsuch mentioned in his book, The Future of Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia, those against legalization say, “Disconnected from autonomy and choice, euthanasia might be extended to a utilitarian account even to persons who do not consent to it (involuntary euthanasia)” (Gorsuch, 102). Practice of euthanasia ought to be seen as part of independent freedom, but perhaps medical offices or [on the extreme end] government may tightly regulate the usage. The worst case scenario could be that euthanasia would no longer be a choice for individuals to have, but rather a requirement to get done under certain conditions; whether a person is born defective or someone is at a particular age. Aside from those fears, legalizing this right would carry its advantages. According to Gorsuch, societal benefits would include reduction of cost in medical treatment and/or suffering for members (Gorsuch, 103). The major question that comes to mind is whether the benefits from each side of the debate would outweigh

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