Pros And Cons Of Dual Federalism

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Federalism is the political system in which ultimate authority is shared between a central government and state or regional governments.
The balance and boundaries between the national and state government have changed greatly. For the framers of the constitution federalism was a way to minimize conformity costs. they knew they couldn’t come up with an exact list of everything the government could and could not being that there will be time where it might has to be some add on to the list. So they add the elastic language to the Article I. where congress will have the power to make any laws which will be necessary and proper for carrying into execution the foregoing powers. Hamilton’s view was national supremacy because Constitution supreme
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It was proposed by Jefferson and Madison in the 1798, where newspaper editors could be punished if they published any stories that were critical to the federal government. The issue was later solved in the final of the civil war.
Once the civil war was over the focus then shifted to congress. There was a debate and from the debates arose the Dual Federalism which held that even though the national government was supreme in its area the states were just as equally in their own area and could be kept separate. The dual federalism means there was interstate commerce which congress could regulate and intrastate commerce which only states can regulate but the Supreme Court would define each one. By the 1940’s this so called dual federalism became more complex that it became impossible to explain due to some many
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This would was a great help state and local official solve dilemma as far as farmers, build highways, or support vocational education. This grant in aid system grew rapidly but over the year the federal government devising grant programs that were less based on what the state and more towards the federal officials thought to be important national needs. State and local officials began to form the intergovernmental lobby which was made up of mayors, governors, superintendents of schools, and state directors of public health, county highway commissioner, local police chiefs and

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