Compare And Contrast The Arguments And Supporting Evidence For Huckleberry Finn

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Arguments and Supporting Evidence for Argumentative Research Paper

Thesis:

Argument 1
Supporting Evidence
Type of Evidence
Satire through the book helps proof that Huckleberry Finn should be in the Curriculum.
“The overall effect is that the satire in the Wilks episode becomes more unified, but less extreme in tone” (Arac, page 152)

In Twain 's writing he used the irony or satire to show the level of outrage that may occur to show some changes that may cause future issues (Arca, page 30).

That Twain was not fully aware that he had racist views through his book because he his time in was just the modern thing to do during his life. When he used satire during his book it was to help move the characters to freedom about at will because it
…show more content…
Arguments and Supporting Evidence for Argumentative Research Paper

Thesis:

Argument 1
Supporting Evidence
Type of Evidence
Satire through the book helps proof that Huckleberry Finn should be in the Curriculum.
“The overall effect is that the satire in the Wilks episode becomes more unified, but less extreme in tone” (Arac, page 152)

In Twain 's writing he used the irony or satire to show the level of outrage that may occur to show some changes that may cause future issues (Arca, page 30).

That Twain was not fully aware that he had racist views through his book because he his time in was just the modern thing to do during his life. When he used satire during his book it was to help move the characters to freedom about at will because it moves the book to the targets and themes of the book (Leonard, page 155). This is a Quotation note.

This is a Summary note.

This is a summary note.

Argument 2
The lessons that the class will learn while reading Huckleberry Finn will be good in a school curriculum.

When Ron Briley taught his class the Huckleberry Finn, written in 1884 by Mark Twain they learned the historical content that Twain uses to help set the setting and era of the book ( Doyno
…show more content…
This is a paraphrase note.

Argument 3
While reading The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn you learn about all the historical information in the novel.

“But the troubling use of the word “nigger” remains. Of course, the world is hardly strange to the students who encounter the power of this language in popular music, comedy routines, and even African American literature is included in the curriculum” (Briley). Ron Briley says teens are exposed are exposed to the “N” word from music and just from other people in their society.

Reading Huckleberry Finn is an history curriculum that puts the novel in the Historical context on the relations of slavery and race in the nineteenth-century America (Briley).

“Generations of schoolchildren, educators, administrator, should see it that way. It was a product of the times and that is exactly what it should stay” ( Hutchinson).

Chadwick says that during Twain’s racist time, this book was okay for the time aera, but as years past the usage of the “N” word is not okay for today’s time period because it would be seen as racist. While in Twain’s time this book is okay because it fits the time period and to Twain’s result he was just thinking how it would be seen in his life not to the future generations it is just people’s choice, if you don’t like it then don’t read it (

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