Mao Zedong's The Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution

1418 Words 6 Pages
The Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution (1966-76) launched and orchestrated by Chairman Mao Zedong aimed to maintain his power in the Chinese government by spreading his ideological beliefs. He aimed to destroy the Four Olds (old ideas, old culture, old customs and old habits). In foundation to this, the Chinese Communist Party’s Central Propaganda Department (CCP-CPD) sought to bring about ‘thought reform’ through the use of propaganda. Propaganda was disseminated into cultural aspects of Chinese life such as music, film, literature, print and media, the education system and work groups. ‘Thought reform’ aimed to ideologically indoctrinate the Chinese citizens so that they would accept Maoism and Marxism-Leninism, and campaigns such as …show more content…
This could also be due to the fact that the intellectual youth are difficult to manipulate as they tend to question information given to them. Therefore, the effect of Mao’s speech and referring back to the Little Red Book, this implies Mao’s belief that the people must “fight the enemy with one heart and one mind” . ‘One heart and one mind’ referring to a revolution successful only if the workers, soldiers and peasants work together to fight against the counter-revolutionaries who were against the Mao Zedong Thought or also known as Maoism. When looking back to the Little Red Book,, the chapter on youth begins with Mao’s analysis that the world belongs to the youth but due to their “lack of political and social experience, quite a number of young people are unable to see the contrast between the old China and the new” . Thus, meaning, in order for the youth – particularly the intellectual youth – to become part of the revolution was to ‘enlighten’ them of what the lack, which in this case was experience and proper tutors. Tutors would then be hired from the working class as it is in their duty for the revolution to succeed to become of ‘one heart and one mind’. The indoctrination in the form of education proved to be effective when a group of university students created what became known as the Red Guards. The Red Guards was a social paramilitary …show more content…
Print media such as posters were simple and rhymed, they showed a clear political and social belief thus allowing those who cannot read to understand what was to be the new China and what there leader calls for them to do. This is shown in Figure 1 (below) is the working, peasant, soldiers and youth clutching their Little Red Books aiming to ‘reform’ or defame the ‘Chinese Khrushchev”, namely Lin Shaoqi. The use of colours and the effect of the short slogan concisely depicts the point wanted to be put across – to criticise Lin Shaoqi. This contrast between the revolutionaries and Lin Shaoqi shows that they are working towards a new

Related Documents