Purpose Of Prohibition

Improved Essays
Prohibition was a period of time taking place in the United States during the early 20th century. This stage of American history involved a nationwide ban on the production, transportation, sale, or consumption of alcoholic beverages from 1920 to 1933. The purpose of Prohibition was to lessen the rate of alcohol consumption. This was accomplished by eliminating the businesses that manufactured, distributed, and sold alcoholic beverages. The Eighteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution also took away from brewers, distillers, vintners, wholesale and retail sellers of alcoholic beverages the license to do business.
Prohibition arose from the need to prevent the consequences of excessive alcohol consumption such as domestic violence and political
…show more content…
t was certainly a time of great criminal activity, with the prohibition laws in America and the world in an economic depression. The people turned more and more to criminal activity, organized criminals such as the American mobsters and European crime syndicates thrived, most common people looked upon these organizations as heroes. Criminals like Al Capone, Bonnie and Clyde and John Dillinger were headliners of the era.
Jobs were scarce and people needed to provide for their families, gangsterism was dangerous but provided an easy way to make money. When the American government passed the Eighteenth amendments outlawing alcohol, people who enjoyed a drink became criminal for doing
…show more content…
Although a great idea in concept, prohibition was ultimately a failure; the public grew less respectful of the law. Drink driving increased and public drunkenness also increased.
After thirteen long years the government finally saw that prohibition was not working, it had infact created more of a problem than it solved, finally the government abolished the prohibition laws.
Crime decreased and the criminal element was taken out of the industry, organized crime in the 1920's flourished in America because of prohibition and it did not stop there, after the prohibition era they simply went on to other markets with their new found wealth.
Had prohibition never happened organized crime syndicates may not have become so wealthy or

Related Documents

  • Superior Essays

    After Prohibition, gangsters were known throughout the country. Prohibition led to the rise of many gangsters, including Waxey Gordon, who became a wealthy bootlegger (Mappen 225). Bootleggers like Gordon made trillions a year because they had a monopoly on alcohol. Prohibition gave rise to the establishment of the first nationwide criminal syndicate (Okrent 4). Gangsters helped end prohibition by selling alcohol which made the government realize that prohibition was not working.…

    • 1252 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    "Prohibition has made nothing but trouble. "- Al Capone. Alcohol was made illegal in the United States in 1920. Not very many people agreed nor followed that law. With so many people being rebellious, it made bootlegging into a big business and made many rich.…

    • 1043 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Speakeasies and Gatsby’s parties would attract the kind of people that would just be likely to drop by without an invitation. Bootlegging is making, selling, or distributing alcohol illegally and, “millions of Americans were willing to drink liquor illegally which gave rise to bootlegging and speakeasies, capitalized upon by organized crime” (Britannica). Gatsby himself earned his fortune by bootlegging during the era of Prohibition, so he took part in the organized crime. Tom says to Gatsby in Chapter seven, “I found out what your ‘drug stores’ were. He turned to us and spoke rapidly.” Nick thinks, “He and Wolfsheim brought up a lot of side-street drug-stores here and in Chicago and sold grain alcohol.…

    • 1588 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    The roaring twenties was an era that consisted of gangs, speakeasies, and bootlegging. During Prohibition sometimes referred to as the "Noble Experiment" the United States announced that the sale and manufacturing of beverages that contained intoxicating liquor were illegal from 1920 to 1933. This action was known to many as the temperance movement, which had tons of supporters across the nation. The temperance movement of the 1920s failed because the demand for alcohol was not eliminated among many Americans, and the law was hard to enforce due to numerous illegal acts produced by it. The elimination of alcohol provides many opportunities for Americans to focus more on life than getting wasted at a bar.…

    • 1146 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Prohibition actually caused more problems for the U.S. than it cured. During the 13 years that Prohibition was in effect the U.S. suffered from the devastating consequences that resulted from Prohibition. Consequences such as the birth of the speakeasy, which allowed a whole new class of drinkers that its predecessors did not allow, these new patrons were women. In Addition, Prohibition was responsible for the rapid growth of organized crime, higher rates of crime, and the creation of extremely wealthy criminals. The high costs associated with the enforcement of the laws of Prohibition, the higher rate of unemployment and the huge loss of excise tax revenue would have a huge harmful effect on the economy in the U.S.…

    • 1496 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Explain the reasons which led to the repeal of prohibition? Prohibition was repealed throughout the whole of America in 1933. Prohibition was a huge failure; there were many reasons which were: Firstly prohibition did not work, it didn’t stop people from drinking all it achieved was turning ordinary citizens into criminals. Alcohol was still widely and easily available, people brewed alcohol in their own…

    • 637 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Some problems included robberies, street fights between drunk men, and drunk men coming home and beating their wives. While inhibited, the Prohibition caused crime to pause for a short amount of time. Until it later turned into a larger issue when crime increased because of the tight control on alcohol. Prohibition affected the United States’ economy as well. The increase in crime costed the government a large amount of money.…

    • 2076 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Prohibition In The 1920's

    • 1461 Words
    • 6 Pages

    During the 1920’s, prohibition was passed down as an amendment to have america stop drinking. Ironically, prohibition had the opposite effect by inspiring people to drink more and go to extreme criminal lengths to acquire alcohol. Maybe the last time you saw an alcoholic product was…

    • 1461 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Prohibition was a period of nearly fourteen years in U.S. history in which the manufacture, sale , and transportation of liquor was made illegal. It led to the first and only time an Amendment to the U.S. Constitution that was repealed. Prohibition was supposed to lower crime and corruption, reduce social problems, lower taxes needed to support prisons and poorhouses, and improve health and hygiene in America, but it failed ( Rosenberg 1) . During this time, Americans had a rebellious act time period because they were against all laws and amendments created for the same reason of prohibition in the United States. These amendments caused instability to Americans to the ones who consumed it and the ones that sold alcohol.…

    • 972 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Previously insignificant criminal gangs were more than willing to accommodate the growing demand for illegal alcohol, and as a result organised crime in America flourished. Building on the strong foundation of bootlegging, the illegal smuggling of alcohol, these criminal gangs expanded into gambling, prostitution, narcotics, extortion, and every other illegal business they could create. They turned bootlegging and the illegal sale of alcohol into a full-fledged industry, organising themselves into complex, effectively-run criminal syndicates in the process. In Chicago, for example, a multitude of different gangs divided the city between themselves. The struggle for prominence above the rest led each gang to compete with the others.…

    • 1402 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays