Prohibition During Prohibition Essay

1043 Words 5 Pages
"Prohibition has made nothing but trouble."- Al Capone. Alcohol was made illegal in the United States in 1920. Not very many people agreed nor followed that law. With so many people being rebellious, it made bootlegging into a big business and made many rich. Getting alcohol during prohibition could be as easy as walking to your neighbors house and picking it up. Law officials took bribes and even had their own stash of alcohol. The eighteenth amendment was hard to enforce due to the unpopularity of it. Many call prohibition an experiment, and the experiment failed miserably. January 16, 1920 the eighteenth amendment was signed into law (Britten). The eighteenth amendment is the period between 1920-1933 when manufacture, transport, …show more content…
One way was, to make their own beer and wine. Loopholes and exemptions allowed home wine production (Indomitable Spirits) There was a lot of poisonous things that went into the home breweries, and not on purpose. Immigrants found abundant of ways to make their own brews and wine (Blumenthal, 77). Another way you could get past the law was doctors could sign you off. Legally a doctor could sign a prescription and then you could drink alcohol (Pietrusza 26). The number of prescriptions that were signed by doctors rose dramatically (Indomitable Spirits). Doctors would often sell prescriptions for the right price (Blumenthal 82). People would wear hip flasks, hide bottles in false books, and in coconut shells. One man was caught hustling over the International Bridge at Buffalo carrying two boxes of eggs, which been drained and the eggs filled with liquor (Britten …show more content…
Not only did Americans continue to manufacture, barter, and have possession of alcohol they drank more of it (Britten 110) How much did they drink? Alcohol consumption was about seven gallon per person in early 1900 's compared to less than three gallons today (Indomitable Spirits). Surveys on college compasses during the 1920 's showed that more students drank than didn 't. Liquor was largely available to those who could afford it. The wealthy continued to insist a regular supply of alcohol, which funded an enormous underground economy (Blumenthal 74,75). Drinkers said you could get a glass of liquor in any building on 52nd street between fifth and sixth avenue. Feds said that 45th street was the wettest street in the country. Fifty million gallons of liquor was stored for "safe keeping" before prohibition. By the end of prohibition twenty million gallons were gone. In Texas, a few months after prohibition, still turning one hundred and thirty gallons of whiskey on Senator Morris Shepard 's farm. He is one of the senators that wrote the eighteenth amendment into law (Britten 110,114) Nineteenth-Century saloons were usually owned by breweries (Hangen). Sometimes it seemed for every saloon that closed half of a dozen underground drinking places would come up (Britten 114). Prohibition was supposed to prevent the consumption of alcohol to Americans but it just

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