Problems Of Depopulation In Japan

1386 Words 6 Pages
Of the 1718 municipalities that exist in Japan, 46% are classified as depopulated; despite occupying over half of the country’s total land, a mere 8% of the national population reside in these municipalities (Rural Independence Promotion Union). The problem of depopulation in villages is exacerbated by a shortage of worker population, resulting into a “graying” population, deteriorated agriculture and industry (Warnock). According to the 2005 census conducted by Statistics Japan, Miyoshi city, in Tokushima Prefecture on Shikoku Island is where the tendency of depopulation is prominent. To combat extinction of municipalities like Miyoshi city, Issei Nishikawa, in “Furusato Nozei no Susume (Recommendation for Hometown Tax),” advocates a nation-wide …show more content…
Although seemingly efficacious, these countermeasures offer temporary fix and thus insufficient. To prove long-term outcome, a plan to revitalize the “graying” economy and population of Miyoshi city must secure a stable influx of working population, which is feasible by promoting enterprises to launch satellite offices, and start-up companies to base in city. An analysis of economic history of Miyoshi city, evaluation of impacts of urban agglomeration to companies, and a scrutiny of the city’s living condition, will support the validity of this …show more content…
As Mamoru Yanagiuchi reports in “Investigation of Marginal Villages Based in Miyoshi City,” the city’s forestry and natural fuel industry faced critical depression as low-cost imported fuel and lumber became easily accessible post-war. Similar post-war decline can be observed in its manufacturing industry, due to rapid migration of companies’ production bases to other prefectures and overseas. Moreover, its rugged topography prohibits development of agriculture, and only subsistence farming on terraced paddy field is possible on its steep slopes (Yanagiuchi). The inevitable drop in working population from poor job prospects, is outlined in “Miyoshi Population Vision” published by the municipal government: from its peak population of 77,779 in 1955 to 29,951 in 2010. Evaluation of Miyoshi city’s adverse topography and its scarcity in profitable natural resource, suggests that minimal improvement of economy and job market can be anticipated from revitalizing the same industries that failed post-war. Rather, a new economy that employs the city’s unique geology must be developed to fully recover its job market and in turn, combat depopulation. Considering this point, “tourism” industry as suggest by The Japan Time’s article will indeed render economic profit through effective use of the city’s abundant

Related Documents