Teen Pregnancy: Public Health Problem

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Public Health Problem Teen Pregnancy is a problem that is completely preventable. It seems as if teen pregnancy has become a hot topic over the recent years, however this concern has been around for centuries. Teen pregnancy can be traced to the Puritans, traditionally if a young female was considered ready she would be made a wife, and then a mother (Adolescent Pregnancy in America). In the United States from the 1950’s to the 1970’s teenage pregnancy rates increased about 47% however, more recent trends are showing that teen pregnancy rates have been decreasing, especially in the United States (CDC: About Teen Pregnancy). Although rates are gradually declining nearly one million teenagers are becoming pregnant yearly in the U.S. Teen pregnancy …show more content…
Teenage pregnancies happen in a variety of ways such as hormones, dating at young ages, being victims of sex abuse, and using alcohol and drugs (Adolescent Pregnancy in America). In today’s society puberty is happening a lot sooner than it was in the past. With puberty happening earlier, more sexual experimentation is happening. Although there is no direct link between early puberty, and becoming pregnant, teens are around more peer pressure. Victims of sex abuse have altered views of sex (Adolescent Pregnancy in America: Causes and Responses). Females were more likely to engage and initiate sexual contact and behavior if they were victims of sexual abuse; they were also more likely to initiate sexual behavior at earlier ages (Adolescent Pregnancy in America). Teenage pregnancies happen all around the globe, in both westernized and non-westernized societies. In the more recent years pregnancy rates in the United States have decreased in all states, and races. However the United States still has one of the highest rates in westernized countries. Compared to the United Kingdom they nearly doubled in teen pregnancy rates, in countries like Japan and Denmark our rates were seven times their rates (Wake Up …show more content…
Two specific examples of intervention programs for addressing teen pregnancies were analyzed between the Netherlands and the United States of America. The U.S.’s take to reduce teen pregnancy is an intervention that includes the advocating for an abstinence-only education. Although the U.S. really advocates an abstinent-only sex education, there are no laws that say any type of sex education is mandatory in public schools. The government provides about $50 billion a year to fund this type of education (abstinence), but it is optional for schools to adopt the program (Wake Up and Smell the Condoms). The United States also teaches students that having sex out of wedlock is frowned upon, and is against societal standards. In turn U.S. teens have far less healthy sexual behaviors compared to the other countries. In the U.S. teens are engaging in sex at far earlier ages than that of other countries, they also have more sex partners compared to other countries. Additionally, the U.S. also reports teens having lower rates of contraceptive use. Sex is a taboo topic in the United States, which makes it difficult for teens to talk to parents, teachers, coaches, friends, or family about sex. Compared to the Netherlands the U.S. falls far behind, sex is not a controversial topic in the Netherlands; instead they teach students about sexual development, healthy sexual behaviors,

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