Privatisation In Private Schools

956 Words 4 Pages
The theoretical analysis of privatisation is important in order to understand why certain policies work. However, the effectiveness of policy in the real world is required to verify the validity of the theoretical framework. To this end, an analysis of the efficacy of private schools in other third world environments is required. A study published through Harvard’s Evidence for Policy Design found astonishing results from low cost private schools in Pakistan (the circumstances of the schools being very similar to many South African contexts, i.e. in poverty with underperforming public schools) (Andrabi et al., 2010:1). The test scores of students, conducted to ensure no cheating, were 0.8 to 1 standard deviations higher in low cost private …show more content…
So what regulation is required? Really, the only regulation required ought to be cross section testing at each grade. All students ought to be registered with the government (a regulation that is important, regardless, to ensure all children are going to school). Then a random sampling at each grade should have to report to a central location in order to complete a standardised test. If private schools achieve results better than the local public schools, even if these results are below the pass mark, they should be allowed to continue to operate. This is a relatively cheap form of regulation and requires little intervention in the running of individual schools. The reason the testing needs to occur at each grade level is if it only occurs as a leaving exam, i.e. the matric exam, problems that are occurring at lower grades could take up to 12 years to be noticed, and this is unacceptably long. A method to make this procedure even more effective is with the use of multiple choice questions, as expensive markers would not be …show more content…
Parents need to know what schools are preforming better than other in order for the market to remain truly competitive (Andrabu, Das & Khwaja, 2014:1). This will allow them to make informed decisions, and thus stimulate the market to preform highly, as underperforming schools will be less successful. It may seem like this ought to be regulated as it is so important to the functioning of the market, however the full disclosure principle may render this unnecessary. The full disclosure principal states that eventually all competitors will reveal their information (de Villiers & Frank, 2015: 146). This is so as those not revealing their information will all be assumed to be at the average of the worst (i.e. those not revealing their information) (de Villiers & Frank, 2015: 146). Thus, those that are better than the average will reveal their information to prove so. This shifts the average of the non-disclosing individuals lower, and thus the process repeats until everyone has revealed their information (de Villiers & Frank, 2015: 146). The problem with this is cheating: without regulation, there is no way for a consumer to know whether the school is reporting accurate information (de Villiers & Frank, 2015: 144). The solution thus ties in to the previous required regulation, the results of the cross section testing ought to be published in an easily accessible area. This solves the

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