Prison Scene In Good Bye Lenin

2303 Words 10 Pages
Mary P. Wood’s assessment of how European films need to be understood and analysed is indicative of not only contemporary European film scholarship trends but also the sheer importance of the role as financier/exhibitor that E.U. media programmes have played in recent decades. Supporting European filmmaking is a crucial undertaking for these E.U. organisations, serving to preserve and to produce a sense of European culture to varying degrees, while also stimulating its economy, much like national film boards and state funding throughout the E.U. tend to do. In the ‘Principles and Criteria’ section on the Irish Film Board website, Irish employment and money being spent in Ireland during production are both listen as considerations for granting …show more content…
it is important to examine one scene in particular that occurs early on in the film: the prison scene. Many viewers of the film may not even remember a ‘prison scene,’ such is the brevity of its screen presence. It occurs in the aftermath of the protagonist Alex meeting future girlfriend Lara at an anti-government protest and his mother Christiane’s ensuing heart attack at the sight of his involvement and arrest. The audience is shown a prison hall containing arrestees of the protest, standing to uniformed attention under the threat of further physical abuse from the guards. Due to his mother’s health, Alex is allowed to leave the prison; and so is the audience of the film. This scene seems minor with regards to its importance to the narrative, yet in fact by choosing to pursue Alex’s familial story rather than that of anti-government protestors as a social group, this scene tells viewers that the setting in which the political themes will play out in the film will be on a domestic and a personal level, rather than an institutional …show more content…
Upon hearing this news, the narrative demonstrates an important sequence: a juxtaposition of three distinct uses of sound. Firstly, the audience encounters ambulance sirens as Christiane is rushed to hospital due to a relapse. This is interspersed with the sound of Ariane tearing down shelves in their kitchen as she desperately and angrily searches for her father’s hidden letters to her and Alex. Finally, throughout the entire sequence, there is a non-diegetic, melodic piano piece that appears to unify and mourn for the two differing images of pain and panic. Jessica Green in her essay “Understanding the Score” makes distinctions between dialogue, noise and music as three different ‘dialects’ of film, for each influences audience reception of the visual happenings on screen. The vital point of this sequence is that it presents both physical (Christiane) and emotional (Ariane) trauma of a family that was divided by a mother’s fear for her children rather than explicit political force as previously assumed. Again, this revelation and the consequential and powerful use of sound within the film solidifies the familial rather than societal focus that this film takes. Think back to the protestors arrested along with Alex; the film is engaging with GDR family life at a specific rather

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