Principles In Marketing Outrageously, By Jon Spoelstra

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Marketing Outrageously is written by Jon Spoelstra who was an adjunct professor that taught sports marketing at the University of Portland. Jon Spoelstra has written other books like Ice to Eskimos, and is known as one of America’s top marketers. Throughout the book Spoelstra talks about 17 ground rules that help not just a business, but anyone who is willing to go an extra step in order to succeed. They’re several principles that Spoelstra mentions throughout the book, but in my perspective I’m going to mention what I think are the top five principles. One of the most important principle in my opinion is ground rule number one: If you aren’t willing to take a few risks in marketing, become a bean counter. This rule deals with how a business …show more content…
This rule deals with the rubber chicken method. The rubber chicken method was sent to customers who weren’t renew their season tickets and encourage them to renew their season tickets and it worked. They got 1,000 extra renewals worth $2.5 million in revenue. Why is the rubber chicken method work? For one, the rubber chicken is sent in a FedEx box and who doesn’t like opening packages, next the rubber chicken is different and it makes people laugh, and attaching the letter to the chicken’s leg is genius because people are all of a sudden intrigued and what to know what the letter is all about. The rubber chicken method also works with printed ads, because the headline should create enough interest in order to pull the reader otherwise its not going to …show more content…
One important factor that relates with this rule is that do thing you’re good at. When you ask any owner of a business the question of what’s more important in any operating business their answer more than likely will be customers, but what about employees. Without employees you don’t have anyone to operate your business. “If bosses started to treat their employees fairly, inspire them, and let them try outrageous thing without fear of being fired or humiliated in front of peers, employees will work harder, smarter, and care for their customers. Customers will love the company, buy more, and spread the business by word of mouth. Shareholders will enjoy the stock value rise, love the higher profit and overall brag about their investment” (243). This causes employees to become more passionate about their jobs, because they feel important within the company. That’s way if any company identify themselves as marketing outrageously employees should be the most important factor of the business, followed by customers, then shareholders. This rule is proven to be successful used by the New Jersey

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