Primal Instinct Lord Of The Flies Analysis

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Deep down in every human being there is one primal instinct hidden away, awaiting the time when it will be unleashed. In William Golding's novel, Lord of the Flies, a group of English schoolboys deserted on an island struggle with the threat of death by their surroundings and most importantly each other. Faced with ultimate death the young boys struggle with the aspects of survival. Adapting England's democracy, the boys elect Ralph; an attractive and intelligent young man to lead the group. Ralph, who is a natural leader himself, appoints a hostile boy named Jack to hunt for the group. When the high of enjoying the island with no adults wears off the boys face the reality that they may not be found, especially if the beast like creature finds …show more content…
Furthermore an imaginary symbol of a beast fueled the boy’s savage instinct. The belief in the beast grew stronger upon the boys embracing their primal instinct, only a boy named Simon realized the truth; the beast was a fragment of their imagination.“‘Maybe,’ he said hesitantly, ‘maybe there is a beast’...’What I meant is...maybe it's only us”’ (Golding 95-96). Simon realizes that the only beasts on the island are themselves; inside each of the boy’s darkness is found which resembles something much darker than they realize. On the other hand the symbol of a signal fire shows what the boys valued most, being saved or embracing their freedom of savagery. “‘If I blow the conch and they don't come back; then we've had it. We shan't keep the fire going. Well be like animals. We'll never be rescued”’ (Golding 99). In this quotation it is shown how important the signal fire is, if there is no signal fire there is no connection to civilization. Thus by the boys not caring about the fire it shows how they have lost the desire to be saved and have now adapted to the lives of savages. Throughout this novel Golding shows through symbolism how symbols connected to civilization are destroyed or forgotten from utmost …show more content…
Some may have not realized that they were becoming what civilization feared, but their actions and deeds all came down to their primal instinct. In Golding's novel, Lord of the Flies each literary device Hubris, Hamartia and symbolism tied into the boys embracing they’re primitive instinct. Jacks hubris turned him into a bloodthirsty animalistic killed who craved power. Ralphs hamartia, which was his confidence in humanity, blindsided him into believing that the boys could do no wrong. Not embracing his primitive side as much as the other boys, he still embraces it enough to feel ashamed of himself. Lastly symbolism provided the novel with the feud of civilization against savagery. When the main symbol of order and civilization is broken Golding shows how savagery wins against civilization when faced with primal instinct. The imaginary beast in turn showed the darkness inside each boy. The last symbol, the signal fire, showed how their hope of being rescued was crushed by them adapting to the lives of savages. In any situation, a human would do whatever it takes for them to survive, as seen in this novel. When it really comes down to it, every person will do whatever it takes for him or her to be the last one standing, whether not it is for food, water, or staying

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