Pride Parades Essay

872 Words 4 Pages
Pride Parades nowadays are known for their colorful rainbow themes and vibrant theatricality with a dash of flamboyance. However, history of Pride Parades dates them back to 1969 to a more somber march with only signs and chants to indicate any social movement at all (Desta). They were held with the purpose to educate the masses regarding the LGBT agenda and to advocate for the rights of LGBT groups. The term LGBT primarily stands for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender which are sexual orientations outside of the supposedly ‘normal’ heterosexuality. Pride Parades are also held to bring attention to some of the major challenges faced by this community in the wake of homophobia, hate crime, etc. Those major challenges that the community go …show more content…
Religion and integral cultural restrictions have come to oppose homoeroticism since the dawn of mankind, particularly Abrahamic religions such as Judaism, Christianity and Islam. According to a recent study done by the Pew Research Center's Social & Demographic Trends, 60% of LGBT adults, aged 18 to 29, are unaffiliated with religion which is double to those of the general public (Gryboski). LGBT individuals tend to describe hostility when it comes to religion due to the religion’s strong opposition of the individuals’ identities. They have to forcibly choose between the religions that they associate with and their internal identity as people with a different sexual orientation. Religion metaphorically becomes an exclusive club that they’re not invited in just for being a tad bit different despite the fact they abide to every rules set by the club. For instance, Christopher Yuan, an author of the memoir about his journey to God as a gay man, said “…A few of my friends were asked to leave their church after simply admitting that they experienced attractions toward the same sex, without ever pursuing gay relationships.” (qtd in Gryboski). Hence, religion is truly an influential factor that contributes to the many challenges faced by the LGBT …show more content…
The anti-gay laws are inclusive with various punishments such as restrictions on LGBT expressions, imprisonment, forced psychiatric treatment and even death penalties on individuals of the group (Jones). Though nowadays we are seeing a positive turnaround regarding the anti-LGBT laws, there are still over 76 countries out of 196 countries in the world where homosexuality is illegal (Jones). Alexey Davydoy was an example of a victim of the Russian law which prohibits the spreading propaganda regarding unconventional sexual orientations. He was immediately detained and suffered a broken arm after revealing a sign saying ‘Being Gay is Normal’ outside the Moscow’s Children Library (Ioffe). The cruel treatment of homosexuality by impractical laws is quite irrational. If we look at the Universal Declaration of Human Rights itself, it states that all human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. Thus the rationale behind criminalizing homosexuality just for its difference in sexual orientations is absurd because these anti-gay laws do not recognize the individuals of LGBT community as human

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