Pride And Sin In Jon Krakauer's Chris Mccandless

1014 Words 5 Pages
Christianity advocates many ideals, however, very few gather as much attention as the seven deadly sins. While the sins provide different battles for every individual, Chris McCandless transformed pride from a deadly sin to a very literal meaning. On April 28th, 1992, Chris embarked on his great Alaskan journey only to be found dead on September 6th of the same year. In Jon Krakauer 's novel Into the Wild, we are given an inside view into Chris ' solitary journey from Emory University to the abandoned bus where he drew his final breath. I firmly believe that Chris ' death could have been avoided if it were not for his pride and arrogance. Chris ' illusions of grandeur clearly illustrate his arrogance by believing he was …show more content…
Chris ' philosophy on gifts confused both his parents and many others: "He had announced to his parents that, on principle, he would no longer give or accept gifts" (Krakauer 20). By making this announcement, he suggested that he only needs himself and not others. This does not even begin to touch on the rudeness of not giving gifts due to a personal philosophy of self-sufficiency, one that proved fatal and ultimately unsustainable due to constant shelter, transportation, and money obtained by others. Henry David Thoreau 's philosophies applied to Chris, but perhaps only in the vaguest sense: "Rather than love, than money, than fame, give me truth. I sat at a table where were rich food and wine in abundance, an obsequious attendance, but sincerity and truth were not" (Krakauer 117). Chris highlighted this passage in a personal book, yet failed to acknowledge the abundance of truth in the hospitality he received from Jan Burres and Bob, Wayne Westerberg, and Russell Fritz. Some argue that Chris was offered no help, however, many people who gave Chris transportation offered food, money, and supplies. In the cinematic adaptation of Into the Wild, Jena Malone says, “The fragility of crystal is not a weakness, but a finesse” (Into the Wild). The fragility of humans causes us to rely on others. Much like crystal, a human’s need of people differs from weakness. Dependence makes us …show more content…
The allure he holds continues even after his death: "It 's some kind of internal thing within them that makes them go out to that bus. I don 't know what it is. I don 't understand" (Saverin 2). His death made him famous, yet his death was caused by his arrogance; therefore it is his arrogance that people champion. Those in opposition argue that Chris ' philosophies apply only to him and he never wished for followers. However, he specifically asked Russell Fritz to leave his selected life: "Ron, I really hope that as soon as you can you will get out of Salton City [. . .] don 't hesitate or allow yourself to make excuses. Just get out and do it" (Krakauer 58). Chris knew that Russell 's love transcended his love for his sober life. By asking him to pick up and leave, he tried to gain followers and turn others to his lifestyle. In Thoreau 's "Ktaadn," Thoreau professes the loveliness of Earth: “This was that Earth of which we had learned, made out of chaos and old night” (Krakauer 172). Chris often preached of nature’s beauty. After Chris’ story went viral, his connection to the Stampede Trail caused a mass exodus of Into the Wild fans to visit the bus. Unfortunately, the visitors almost destroyed the wilderness around Chris’ final resting place. With Chris’ arrogance comes the destruction of lives and nature

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