Marriage In Pride And Prejudice

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Pride and Prejudice Views of Marriage in Comparison to the Bible Marriage is a big deal in the Bible and in the novel, Pride and Prejudice. Marriage is viewed differently in these two books, but also has some comparisons. There are many quotes throughout the novel, Pride and Prejudice, that show what was expected of marriage and what it consisted of in that time period that can be compared to what the Bible has to say about marriage. Three examples of marriage that can be related to what the Bible defines marriage to be are Mr. Collins’s proposal to Lizzy, the news of Mr. Collins getting married to Charlotte, and the marriage between Mr. and Mrs. Bennet. In then novel, Pride and Prejudice, men married women and would usually do so to receive …show more content…
Collins’s proposal. Her best friend, Charlotte, decided to marry him. She claims that she wasn’t going to find marriage for love and decided to marry him for his protection. She came to terms with the fact that she would not find anyone else. “I ask only a comfortable home; and considering Mr. Collins’s character, connections, and situation in life, I am convinced that my chance of happiness with him us fair, as most people can boast on entering the marriage state.” (p. 87) “Without thinking highly either of men or matrimony, marriage had always been her object; it was the only provision for well-educated young women of small fortune, and however uncertain of giving happiness, must be their pleasantest preservative from want.” (p. …show more content…
and Mrs. Bennet. Their marriage is one that wasn’t based on happiness. “Her father, captivated by youth and beauty, and that appearance of good humour which youth and beauty generally give, had married a woman whose weak understanding and illiberal mind had very early in their marriage put an end to all real affection for her.” (p. 159) He didn’t marry her because he loved her, therefore “respect, esteem, and confidence had vanished forever; and all his views of domestic happiness were overthrown.” (p. 159) “To his wife he was very little otherwise indebted, than as her ignorance and folly had contributed to his amusement. This is not the sort of happiness which a man would in general wish to owe to is wife; but where other powers of entertainment are wanting, the true philosopher will derive benefit from such as are given.” (p. 159) Mr. Bennet sees his wife, not as a partner or helper, but as an amusement. Because of this troubled marriage, it caused issues for the five children that came from it. “But she had never felt so strongly as now the disadvantages which must attend the children of so unsuitable marriage, nor ever been so fully aware of the evils arising from so ill-judged a direction of talents; talents, which, rightly used, might at least have preserved the respectability of his daughters, even if incapable of enlarging the mind of his wife.” (p. 160) God does not want this in a

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