Pride And Prejudice Marriage Analysis

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One of the major themes in the novel, Pride and Prejudice, by Jane Austen, is marriage. Unlike today, women in the nineteenth century women did not have a lot choices. One of the choices include marriage. Women in this time were held back and are not expected to have careers like men. Once they decide on a man, there is no going back and divorce was considered uncommon. The women in the novel, each display their thoughts on marriage. However, Elizabeth Bennett, who is opinionated and passionate about her beliefs, is inclined to disagree with the norms of the society the most. While others believe that marriage is the key to happiness, she disagrees. She is not easily influenced by those surrounding her, even her family, and her honesty and …show more content…
Elizabeth thinks in an advanced way and seems to be ahead of the other characters in the novel. She suggests that it is better for a woman to be sure with her feelings towards the man, which Charlotte clearly disagrees. Charlotte believes that for her to be happy in a marriage, is by having low expectations. Her only desires are to have a house to keep and children to raise. She also believes that she does not want to know a lot of the man as it could ruin a couple’s relationship. Charlotte states that she hopes that Elizabeth “will be satisfied with what I have done. I am not romantic, you know; I never was. I ask only a comfortable home; and considering Mr. Collins’s character, connection, and situation in life, I am convinced that my chance of happiness with him is as fair as most people can boast on entering the marriage state …show more content…
She is not easily influenced by those around her and holds her beliefs. She believes that marrying someone because of looks and economic stability is not the solution. She disagrees in spontaneous choices which would cause mistakes made by her sisters and parents. For example, Elizabeth waits to be sure that she truly loves Darcy and evaluates Darcy’s actions. Ultimately, today, there are many factors that must be considered before getting married. Just because someone is rich or likeable does not mean that love is present because that is not the key to

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