Jane Austen Feminist Analysis

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Feminism, a highly controversial issue in the late eighteenth century England, and the key figure of this particular movement is John Stuart Mill and Mary Woolstonecraft is seen to be the leading figure, who fights for social equality among men and women, especially by providing equal opportunities and rights in the fields of education and marriage. Women’s rights were a disputatious topic during the eighteenth century and Austen certainly concerned herself therefore, Feminism, is a belief that women should be treated as potential intellectual and social equals regardless of gender. Jane Austen, holds substantial feminist views and uses the novel to express her opinions about the issues faced by women during her time. However, Austen, through …show more content…
Collins . With such bold acts, Elizabeth brings out definite feminist values of sovereignty and equality. She, with respect to her defiant attitude, and opposition to the expectation of certain behavior by women, shows a true feminist point. Jane Austen, shows the sexism of the time, that severely affects the standards of both men and women. Men, however, are described as elite, sophisticated, handsome, polite and rich. They are never expected to behave in a certain way, which is direct contrast to the scrutinization of aspects related to a woman. Austen, doesn’t mock at the accomplishments rather she ridicules that the accomplishments are forced. Austen disagrees with the examination conducted on woman, if she fits in the society, and it’s norms. She’s also opposed to the ideas of lack of scrutiny that men face, as compared to …show more content…
It is quite evident that, Austen has put across her own feelings in portraying the women of her time. She depicts the unjustness of the social standards between men and women, but it is clear that feminist views didn’t through her direct quotes by characters rather came in an indirectly through actions. With the evidences provided by Austen, the justification which holds the views regarding the feminist opinions through this prominent novel. The upper class ladies are treated to be fragile goddesses, and marriage proves to be a courting ritual, which is an imperial part of the society. But Austen, describes perfect ladies to be snobs, hypocritical, fakes, liars. Elizabeth’s feminist influence can be examined through a direct contrast with other three female characters in the novel : Caroline, Jane Bennet and Charlotte. This contrast discloses Elizabeth’s independence from masculine temptation which dominates the female society. All the

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