President Ho Chi Minh And The Vietnam War

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On the other side of the ideological spectrum, a Communist Soviet Union, which is now Russia after the collapse of the Soviet Union; welcomed Vietnamese President Ho Chi Minh from the Communist nation of North Vietnam. In the Soviet Union, Vietnamese President Ho Chi Minh continued his education from France about politics. It can easily be seen that an education from France and an education from the Soviet Union (pre what is now Russia), on the subject of politics is two different things, especially due to the difference between the two countries’ governments’ ideological preferences to govern their respective jurisdictions. France is a non-Communist and the Soviet Union was a Communist country. Of course, as a former student in France, it …show more content…
During especially the end of the Vietnam War, there was a war fatigue in the United States. The war was unpopular. There were protests against the war throughout the United States as we know from the history books. Vietnamese President Ho Chi Minh may have used Communism to sustain nationalism in Vietnam by predicting to his credit correctly, if North Vietnam were to engage the United States long enough at some point, the United States could withdraw. United States President Lyndon Baines Johnson, who eventually did not even sought the renomination of his party (Democratic) for re-election to the Presidency of the United States of America in part due to what is going on in the Vietnam War and the American electorate did not have the appetite for the war. United States President Richard Milhous Nixon, United States President Lyndon Baines Johnson’s successor to the Presidency of the United States of America had the same sentiment for the war in Vietnam at least politically speaking and he for all intended purposes ended the war although, it was United States President Gerald Rudolph Ford, one of his successor to the Presidency of the United States of America after the Watergate scandal led to the resignation of United States President Richard Milhous Nixon, who officially ended the war due to lack of funding for the war which was …show more content…
Barbara Tuchman once asked why doesn’t “the light of the waves behind us allow us to infer the nature of the waves ahead” (1984, 333). I will argue, that it is indeed the illusion of American Exceptionalism that has blinded us to the realities of foreign involvement. The failure to learn from previous mistakes dates back to the Peloponnesian War. Athens, after all, displayed the same hubris as our decision makers. One need only to read the Melian Dialogue to understand. Yet, not only did decision makers not understand the lessons of Vietnam, they ignored it completely with their decision to invade Iraq. One great lesson emerges from history, large powers cannot occupy small nations. The people will come to resent them, the only way to stay is to commit to living there permanently or commit genocide. Nixon (and the Madman Theory) came close to the latter course of action in Vietnam. It is impossible to overestimate the hubris of policy makers in large nations with imperial pretensions. Always there is the possibility of miscalculation which leads to a catastrophic event. Note the Athenian decision to invade Sicily and compare the Athenian attitude to those who still believe we should unilaterally attempt to reshape the Middle

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