Preschoolers Language Development

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Researchers and clinicians use a number of measures to analyze preschoolers’ language development. Researchers primarily use two methods in order to gain this information. The first kind is a language sample analysis. While similar to the measurements used on toddlers, there are more options available to study the development of preschoolers. To study semantics, researchers look at the “total number of words” (TNW), number of different words (NDW), and the type token ratio (TTR)”. In order to study syntax, they will focus on “mean length of utterance (MLU) and developmental sentence scoring.” Furthermore, researchers can use developmental sentence scoring (DSS) to look at a child’s syntax. DSS looks at eight different categories and gives researchers …show more content…
In this measurement, they attempt to see if the preschool-aged child is struggling with certain aspects of English. If this is the case, then he or she will move on to comprehensive exams. There are some screening methods worth noting, such as the Expressive Vocabulary Test-Second Edition (EVT-2). This is great for gauging a child’s acquisition of high-frequency words, such as hand or the color blue. A benefit of this test is its brevity. It typically takes around 10 minutes to administer this test. Another test worth mentioning is Phonological Awareness Literacy Screening-PreK (PALS-PreK). This test is primarily focused on the child’s knowledge of phonology and printed letters. The PALS-PreK helps the teachers prepare for the school …show more content…
These “tools are used to measure and monitor a child’s progress in a certain area of language development.” This measurement also has two major scales. The first one is the OWLS, which stands for the Oral and Written Language Scales. This measures both forms of language, receptive and expressive. There are three scales that are included, which are “the Listening Comprehension scale, the Oral Expression scale, and the Written Expression scale.” These are administered in unique ways. For instance, the Oral Expression scale is concerned with expressive language. It only takes 10-25 minutes. However, the Listening Comprehension scale measures vocabulary knowledge possessed by the child. It can take between 3-15 minutes. Thus, the scales differ in distinct ways. Another measurement that focuses on progress monitoring is the Test of Preschool Early Literacy (TOPEL). In this measurement, there are three subtests, the Print Knowledge subtest, the Definitional Vocabulary subtest, and the Phonological Awareness subtest. These three together are meant to form a composite score and to assist in identifying literacy

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