Prejudice And Discrimination In The Help By Kathryn Stockett

1714 Words 7 Pages
Prejudice dates to the very beginning of the United States, when the Europeans interacted with aboriginal tribes. There are some powerful movies that depict prejudice, and the reality of how people hurt one another. Today, racism ignites the riots of the black communities, as several black men and women, unarmed, and with little reasoning, are shot. It encouraged many to partake in the social protests, #BlackLivesMatter movement and take a knee (a national anthem protest), over police brutality. As a reminder of the past, The Help refers to Kathryn Stockett’s novel and film adaptation about racial inequality in the 1960s. Back then, African Americans were segregated, and living with harsh, constant oppression. There are many elements to address …show more content…
It shows segregation and the discrimination of blacks. The main antagonist, Hilly, is descriptively racist in a native sense, having been soiled and raised with prejudice. Hilly’s primary goal was to silence Skeeter, Minny, and their associates because of the “terrible awful.” In which, Minny had baked her excrement into a renowned chocolate pie. The power and oppression conflict took place within the interactions between the white people and African Americans. The African Americans were degraded in the time by being treated with less consideration. However, its interesting to note that mostly the older people were most racist versus the children. In fact, the children expressed affection and trust towards their maids. There is also conflict between Skeeter and her mother on Skeeter being single. In the 1960s, women were expected to marry young and become housewives, hence the reason why Celia hires a maid. The implication here is that women who can not get pregnant, or are unmarried, are deemed …show more content…
However, my status as identifying as both African American and white would obliviously been presented differently from both races. During the 1960s, and throughout the history of segregation, biracial people were treated based on appearances. However, they were mostly labeled black because of their dark pigmentation. Also, interracial marriage was rare during the 1960s. My mother’s side of the family has had a slight history of racially discriminating against African Americans, and other races. Mostly, it’s common with our older generations, where one relative showed his disapproval of my mother marrying a black man. My father’s side, a predominantly black family, didn’t face much discrimination to my knowledge. However, it is surprising to note that there are racial tensions within the black community towards each other. By appearances, African Americans that have either light (lighter) or dark (darker) skin from the “norm” are discriminated against. My identity would have been a rarity in the 1960s, I would have been labeled as African American, and childhood state (South Dakota) was mostly racially homogeneous. My parent’s relationship in the past would have been groundbreaking and socially

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