Postmodern Perspective Of The Family

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The concept of the family was traditionally something that was mutually agreed throughout society. In which the family as Murdock, a functionalist sociologist, defined it to be “a social group characterised by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction” (Murdock, 1949:1). Thus dominated family structures within society and was favoured by all due to its idealistic nature. But within today’s society it is something that has become particularly diverse. Therefore it has become a concept that many theorists have found difficult to define with many sociological approaches offering different definitions. In which there is no agreed set definition. Thus in this essay, I will examine the differences in the explanations to the changes …show more content…
This was due to the belief that women experience a range of social, economic, political and personal disadvantages within society on a daily basis. Furthermore, due to the fact that this is a widespread issue there are many subcategories that each have their own agenda. Liberal feminism acknowledge the biological differences between men and women but cannot see how they are adequate justifications for gendered inequalities. Marxist feminism suggests that women are doubly exploited, within the workplace by capitalism and in the home by patriarchy. Radical feminism aim for a radical overthrow of the current system as it paved way for capitalist forms of economic and gendered exploitation. Though it has been criticised for focusing on “the level of the individual woman rather than looking at the historical and systematic features of women’s collective experience” (Jones et al, 2015: 214). Therefore suggesting that it is a rather individualistic approach by adding meaning to personal experiences instead of adding meaning to widespread, historical …show more content…
In which he identified that industrialisation led to the replacement of extended families by the nuclear family as it was “well suited to an industrial economy” (Fulcher and Scott, 2011:434). This is because it allowed for one member of the family, particularly the male breadwinner, to earn money through paid work in the factories and the other, usually the wife, bringing up the children and taking care of the home. The function that the capitalist mode aimed to project upon the newly changing society. In contrast to the agricultural work these individuals did prior, the work within the factories appeared to be rather meritocratic. Due to the fact that employment was established upon the skill of the individual not through the prior strength of the extended family ties. Though, Michael Anderson (1971) found that extended families were common well into the mid-19th century and were actually strengthened especially among the poor. Furthermore, these kinship ties could provide a network to those new to the city and in absence of a welfare and healthcare state. The elderly in these networks would be able to provide childcare with those with parents working within the factories and support to the unemployed, often teaching new skills they had learned previously to improve their job

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