Post-Partum Depression In The Yellow Wallpaper

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The Yellow Wallpaper is about a woman driven insane by post-partum depression and a dangerous treatment. This imaginary of a woman, which at first is just her shadow against the bars of the wallpaper pattern is her identity, she continues with the conflict she experiences and eventually leading to a mental breakdown of her identity. She was told that the resting cure would cure her and she should start feeling normal again. In the early 1900’s woman were not really allowed to under mind their husband and even though Jane knew she had a mental illness, her husband thought he knew what was best for her even after trying to express that to him numerous times. Overall this would have to be a victory and a lost. It’s a victory because Jane is now …show more content…
She was put on the rest cure which is the treatment for an illness of rest and isolation in a good quiet environment. As the story goes on Jane starts to realize that this rest cure is not working and she wanted to figure out what was wrong. Constantly always alone and stuck in the bedroom that’s when Jane starts to hallucinate and begins to notice the lady in the yellow wallpaper. Jane begins to become fixated with the yellow wallpaper, she starts to believe that she is seeing a lady in the wallpaper. As she becomes more fixated on the wallpaper she begins to become more disassociated with her day to day living activities. As the sun starts to go down the sun shining through the bars and seeing her own shadow could leave her to believe that she is seeing a lady on the yellow wallpaper. It feels as if she started to feel as if she was in prison so that projects her true feelings about how she was truly feeling on the inside. Her mental stability starts to diminish as she talks about being depressed enough to jump out the windows but the bars are way too strong (Gillman). Jane starts to keep a secret diary as a way to relieve her wandering mind, her true thoughts and feelings are hidden from the world and she begins to slip into this fantasy …show more content…
John’s way of treating the nervous condition he believes his wife has gone horribly wrong, but as her husband, he was really trying to help her get better, not make her any worse but her condition ends up worsen. The problem with John is not that he doesn’t love his wife, but is that he doesn’t want to listen to her and he feels because he is her husband and doctor he knows what’s best for her overriding her own opinion. John believes that he is so certain that he knows what’s best for his wife that he disregards and belittles her own opinion about her well-being, also forcing her to hide what her true feelings really are. He consistently talks down to her and makes her feel as if she is a child herself. He calls her a “blessed little goose” (Gillman) and under minds all the suggestions she makes, such as refusing to switch bedrooms when she asks so as not to grant her “fancies” (Gillman). He does not intentionally intend to bring or wish any harm to her, but he is definitely blind about what help she really needs and it proves to end up being dangerous for John. You can tell that he know that his wife is sick, but really doesn’t understand the struggling woman inside prevents him from truly understanding what her and her problems were. After breaking the door down to get to his wife, John faints

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