Post Mao China Case Study

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Register to read the introduction… No one foresaw the radical changes that would be made in post-Mao China under the rule of Deng Xiaoping. The once removed CPC official took his position as Supreme Leader of China at the age of 77. However the changes that were seen in his next 20 years of office would be more radical than any leader of China before him. Deng was a follower of his predecessor and mentor Zhou Enlai, and with his coming of office announced that China was adapting the Four Modernizations – agriculture, industry, science and tech, and national security. These four modernizations originally set fourth by Zhou Enlai, became defining features of 20th century China. The Four Modernizations were designed to make China a great economic power by the early 21st century. These reforms essentially stressed economic self-reliance. The People's Republic of China decided to accelerate the modernization process by stepping up the volume of foreign trade by opening up its markets, especially the purchase of machinery from Japan and the West. By participating in such export-led growth, China was able to speed up its economic development through foreign investment, a more open market, access to advanced technologies, and management experience. However, this freedom did not come easily. Deng …show more content…
By the terms of the treaty, Japan regained its sovereignty, but lost many of its possessions from before World War II, including Korea and Taiwan. However, relations with the United States was better than ever as proven by the wing of protection that was offered out by the United States through the bi-lateral security system agreement that was signed soon after. With its sovereignty regained, a party known as the LDP (Liberal Democratic Party) took control of Japanese politics. This federation of parties dominated Japan from the early 50’s to the late 80’s. The LDP developed a monopoly on the political process by using subsidies in order to gain votes. While in power, LDP leaders developed the Yoshida Doctrine. The doctrine stated that because of the consideration of the United States, Japan would not have to invest money into National Security. It stated that Japan will never wage an offensive war and decided on a 1% ceiling of the GNP to spend on National Security. Like China, Japan had a vast influx of foreign investment from the U.S. By 1980, many Japanese products, particularly automobiles and electronics, were being exported around the world, and Japan's industrial sector was the second-largest in the world after the U.S. This growth pattern continued unabated despite recession in the 1990s. Japan also developed a mixed economy that was the reverse of the Chinese mixed economy. It developed its Industrial Policy greatly with government set goals and elements of a command economy. Japan’s bureaucracy also saw change. In Japan, the government has a special relation with the public sector, one that is very uncommon in regular markets. The telephone line directly from the House of Nomura and the Prime Minister is one example of this. In addition to the best work being for the public sector, it is seen that there is a cozy relationship between politics,

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