Negative Effects Of The Renaissance

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The Renaissance was a period of time that lasted from the fourteenth to the seventeenth century in Europe. Before the Renaissance, the Bubonic Plague struck Europe. It was a depressing time for people as more of their loved ones were getting sick and dying every day. This disease led to an opening in science and medicine. The plague killed about twenty-five million people, but it did have a positive influence on the world since it improved medicine and medical technology.
The plague had a devastating impact on medieval towns and many Christians blamed Jews, the poor foreigners and travelers, for the spread of the plague (Feld 20). Christians tortured Jews into confessing that they were responsible for poisoning all water sources, and Jews were
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During this time period many people traveled by boat, and rats were on the boats. This means that wherever the boat went, the rats and fleas went, then they spread through the different towns. People lived crowded together. Medieval towns had no running water, so people did not often bathe. Chamber pots, also used as toilets, were emptied into nearby streams and canals. Garbage was also tossed into streams, canals, and on the streets which contributed to the spread of germs. Most people who caught the plague died within days, and in some places whole communities were wiped out (Frey 53). Over the next two centuries, this terrifying disease killed millions in Europe (Frey 53). Dumping chamber pots and garbage, and not showering had a huge effect on the spread of the plague.
There were many medical advantages from the plague because as people were dying more, doctors became interested in finding the cure. Before the Renaissance, doctors had more faith in magic and religion, and most did not believe that science could help cure an illness (Finger). After the Black Death struck, more people started becoming interested in diseases and medicine, and
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This gave a better chance for militaries to win the war. The smaller population also helped fishermen. Even though there were less people in a crew, there were also less people fishing, which allowed crews to catch more fish (Currie 77). This resulted in families and towns having more food. Lower population levels encouraged technological innovation as people learned to do more with less help (Currie 77). With less people living in medieval towns, life was easier for the people. Medical progress was spurred on because of the appearance in the fourteenth century of the Black Death or Bubonic plague, and in the fifteenth century because of Syphilis (Corrick 92-93). The deaths of so many people speeded changes in Europe’s economic and social structure so drastically that it contributed to the decline of Feudalism (Frey 57). After the plague, life was better for the people that lived in medieval

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