Positive And Negative Effects Of The Internet

717 Words 3 Pages
The Internet acts as a gateway to countless bits and pieces of information as well as numerous insignificant distractions. Although the Internet proposes a bounty of beneficial material, it also offers an abundance of useless information. Hanna Price, author of “Psychology of Emotions, Motivations, and Actions: Internet Addiction,” states that “The creation of the Internet has had several positive and negative results on the world” (95). Positively, the Internet has opened the door for many technological advances to be made in the world that has greatly increased the amount of jobs available to citizens worldwide. However, the Internet has also caused a major addiction and dependency problem with the world’s society as a whole. …show more content…
According to “Psychology of Emotions, Motivations, and Actions: Internet Addiction” by Hanna Price, “[The internet’s] almost unlimited possibilities . . . make it a very popular tool” (85). Search engines allow people to enter any query into a search bar and end up with an answer to the question almost instantaneously. “Whereas the benefits are undeniable, some people to suffer the consequences of excessive use” (86). Although the Internet offers information to its users, there comes a point when the amount of time spent on one’s technological device becomes extreme; this is especially evident in today’s society. Because many people believe the articles he or she may come across on the Internet, people are becoming dependent on search engines for almost anything. Whatever the topic may be, individuals expect the Internet to come up with an answer in a matter of seconds when, in fact, the search results are usually not even completely reliable or trustworthy. Anyone can write anything on the Internet; people will see it, read it, and believe …show more content…
These sites are subsequently addictive because of the numerous quantities of rather unimportant personal information and opinions offered by users of each social media site. Robert Kraut, Malcolm Brynin, and Sara Kiesler, authors of “Computers, Phones, and the Internet: Domesticating Information Technology,” explain that due to the growing technology addiction, people have “marveled at the nature, speed, and sheer abundance of communication among teenagers” (185). Most communication pathways used by teenagers these days are that of text message or social media post. Teenagers have become so hooked to his or her device and social media site that “today’s youth are referred to as the Internet and IM generation” (185). Sadly, this information is quite relatable as it describes many teens that can be visibly seen on a daily basis that are practically glued to his or her cell phone rather than becoming involved in real world

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