Portrayal Of Mental Media Essay

Superior Essays
Levin, A. (2011). Media cling to Stigmatizing portrayals of mental illness. Psychiatric News, 46(24), 16a–16a. doi:10.1176/pn.46.24.psychnews_46_24_16-a
Explanation of article:
This article takes a look at how people diagnosed with a mental illness is portrayed in the media in regards to violent offences. The article shows how media outlets frame their stories. Levin talks about how, “People with mental disorders are more likely to be victims of crimes than perpetrators, but this is not how the media is showing it. This article talks about the wording or stigma that gets attached to a perpetrator such as psychos, maniacs, or schizophrenics which general society associates with mental illness which contributes to this belief. The belief that people with mental illness are more violent could be a construct of deinstitutionalization of major psychiatric hospitals and asylums. Deinstitutionalization has caused this belief that since they are out of those settings they are going into community mental health settings which cannot handle this increase and provide inadequate resources and assistance compares to the hospitals or asylums. Studies have shown that violence since deinstitutionalization has remained the same and that people who are diagnosed with a mental illness are more likely to be victims than
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This article looks at the importance of the works we use, and the lack of literature on cultural competence in regards to mental health. Within the article talks about the need to increase cultural competence because cities, towns, and rural settings are becoming more diverse which increases different culture, beliefs, and norms. Also the importance of cultural competence is because certain backgrounds or ethnic groups underutilize mental health services, or have a different view or belief on mental health

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