Pollution Of India Essay

1650 Words 7 Pages
Several civilizations are plagued by pollution, yet one country in particular struggles with several types of pollution. Agricultural, industrial, and domestic pollution fill the rivers of India, creating several issues for the peoples that reside there. The large population of the country tends to be the cause of most pollution: "India 's population of nearly 1.2 billion accounts for about 17 percent of the world’s population... it has been experiencing rapid economic growth of about 6.4 percent annually over the last two decades, placing significant pressure on the environment.” The environment simply cannot handle the large amount of people as the resources struggle to support the large population. Due to the …show more content…
When transporting these cattle, the people of India often wander with their animals through the rivers in their path. The main choice for cattle and the cattle that most often travels throughout India’s rivers is the water buffalo. This can often cause the lingering of silt, bacteria, organics, and can frequently cause the soil on the banks to deplete. Although most of these are natural causes, they are still very much so considered to be a type of water pollution. When the rivers fill with silt, the water may become unsuitable for the peoples to drink. When the animals wade in the rivers, the water that is filled with bacteria also becomes unsuitable to drink. Not only does the water become unsafe to consume, but the land that surrounds these rivers begins to get consumed by the rivers. This in effect leaves less land for these farmers to use, and if continued, could affect India’s economy in a serious way. We are able to see that the agricultural pollution not only affects the water, but it also in turn affects the ability for the people of India to plant crops and further their …show more content…
A specific study of the River Hindon demonstrates an example of the severe damage. There were extreme amounts of heavy metal pollution in the water, which is usually caused by industrial discharges. This study also reveals that the water distributed into the Hindon is barely treated and contains large amounts of this heavy metal pollution: “Many industries have not installed adequate water pollution control devices and discharge their effluents directly into the River Hindon with no or only nominal treatment.” The effects of such careless pollution heavily influence the lives of Indian citizens. The heavy metal ridden waters are not safe for consumption or for agricultural use. We again see that pollution ruins the livelihood and possibly the income of these

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