Pollution In China

1116 Words 5 Pages
China’s pollution problem can be attributed to many different structures that exist within the country. These structures make the issue extremely difficult to resolve and address; these structures are political, economic, and social. Politically, extortion and bribery is rampant in the Chinese government, this leads to money exceeding the needs of people. Economically, China is one of the top locations for companies to outsource production; as a result, China has no control over the emissions these outsourced factories produce. Lastly, there exists a social structure in China where those most affected by the pollution are peasants; these peasants are often uneducated and unable to voice their complaints. For these reasons, China is unable to …show more content…
As a result, the country has a looming international influence. Outsourcing in China is a huge economic boost to the country “China [was] singled out as [one of] the market’s top revenue generators, pulling in revenues worth US$48 billion” (Yu). One can see the amazing financial gain that China experiences due to outsourcing; however, since many of the country’s industries are owned by foreign companies, it makes it extremely hard for China to control them. In addition, China is such an attractive and alluring location because of its lax stance on pollution. Industries that produce pollution are attracted to China because they can easily sacrifice the benefit of the environment for the benefit of revenues and profits. Consequently, if China were to actually crack down on pollution and implement better and more effective laws and agencies, it would decrease the amount of companies wanting to outsource their. Since China is still a developing nation, it still needs as much revenue as possible; as a result, the Chinese government is encouraged to look the other way when it means that profits will …show more content…
As a result, a detrimental social institution is created where those who are the most affected are unable to voice their opinions. Many of the lower class Chinese citizens even die from the pollution and terrible working conditions that factories create, “Jaw-long stands with friends… the portraits behind depict his father and uncle, who both worked in a nearby steel factory and died due to undiagnosed respiratory problems. [he] has dropped out of school to help his mother” (Datta). Not only are the conditions poor in these towns, but the only work in them is in the factories. Thus, the factories have major control over the people and can treat them however they please. Jaw-long has lost both his uncle and father to a mysterious illness that they caught working in the local factory; Jaw-long was not only forced to drop out of school, but also be the man of the house. The fact that a child is forced to grow up in such a harsh environment simply for economic gain is ridiculous, if Jaw-long and his family were given basic human rights, his father and uncle may very well still be alive and Jaw-long would be able to finish

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