Iran Political Analysis

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The Islamic Republic of Iran is a nation that is often characterized by its theocratic nature that seems foreign to most westerners. This mixture of God and government comes from a long history of religion and government being used jointly to create a better Iran for the people. Previously to 1979, Iran was used by western countries because of its rich natural resources, especially oil with the introduction of the Anglo-Iranian Oil Company. When Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi became the leader, he turned to censorship, secret police and executions in order to instill fear in the people. Because of this, the people began the Islamic Revolution which started a period of turmoil and change for the people. The nature of Iranian politics turned from …show more content…
In 1979, the country undertook one of the most explosive revolutions in recent history. The Islamic Revolution, led in part by Ruhollah Khomeini with the help of intellectuals, military and political leaders, overthrew the government under Pahlavi and put in place their own system of a supreme leader, clergy and several councils. One variable that inflamed the people was the push for westernization of Iran, which would create a more secular government, eliminating religion’s role in governing the people. As more and more intellectuals came together to discuss the course of Iranian politics, they began to realize that creating their own government would be the only way to keep religion as number one in their lives. In February and March, demonstrations broke out around the country both in large cities and rural areas, protesting against the shah’s new policies of westernization and eliminating religion from government. After a …show more content…
As the fifth President of Iran, he supported relations with other countries, freedom of expression and free market. Consider the first reformist president, he often had problems with the organizations that were strictly religious. His first concern was not religion in government which although clashed with many religious people, also showed that the 70% of the country that elected him believed that religion was not their number one concern. The next president, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, although strictly religious and an advocate of tying Islam and politics, his hatred of economists led him to throw the country into economic failure. “He disbanded the Management and Planning Organization, … he injected billions of dollars in oil revenues directly into the economy with his rural bequests and grants,” (Secor 274). As the government inflated the money, more people became unemployed and wages were low, religion was tied to the failings and the people were becoming upset with religion and government. Afshin Molavi believed that because religion had such a central role in politics that often failed, the people were becoming disconnected from their faith. He said, “There is a rising tide of anti-clericalism among ordinary Iranians as a result of the failures of the Iranian Republic.” When the government crashed, it took the people’s religion with it and many

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