Summary: Political Instability In The Middle East

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Even though the middle east has overcame western domination over the past centuries, one can beyond doubt see the political instability that plagues the middle east, and this political irregularity will cause increasing international turmoil. The Middle East is in a very fragile state that one big incident can cause it to shatter like a tray of glasses being bumbed. When this happens it could possible take the rest of the world with it. This political instability all happened because of the sunni and shia split that happen so long ago. This conflict has created many terrorist organizations that disturb the peace and stability of the middle eastern politics. These terrorist groups have caused many countries in the Middle East to have unstable …show more content…
Iraq is under control of ISIS so there is a bureaucratic hierarchy and the old government struggles for control.” (Black). Iraq is in dire need of a political reform especially if ISIS is control. “Iran has a republic led by president Hassan but, Supreme leader Ayatollah calls the shots.” (Black). Iraq has a government set up but, it’s complex with power struggle between two leaders. “Syria is led by president Assad but Hezbollah and Iraqi shia militants have power. The economy is in ruins and fear of ISIS has weaken Assad 's support.” (Black). Syria is being fought over by three political groups and the most stable is losing support. The constant fighting is weaken the economy. “Saudi Arabia government is like a monarch they supported sunni rebels in syria and Iraq.” (Black). Saudi Arabia is more stable than other countries in the Middle East but that is from the help of the U.S. “Egypt has a democracy and has a peace treaty amongst Israel. Turkey has interest in northern iraq.” (Black). Those three countries are the most stable in the Middle East but, that is not enough. There needs to be more secure political systems. The ally system is confusing and there is lot of people fighting against each other. “Iraq, Iran, Syria, Saudi Arabia, turkey, and egypt are against ISIS. Iraq, Iran, and Syria are against Saudi Arabia. Saudi Arabia is against Syria, Iran, and Iraq …show more content…
This split caused terrorist groups to rise up and bring terror to the Middle East and the world. Most of the Middle East is fighting against one another all because of intolerance. If political stability isn’t established the world will be in

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