Iraq's Role In The Gulf War

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In 1990, within the Gulf region, political, social and economic tensions were high due to the differing islamic denominations in neighboring nations. By far the largest of these denominations of Islam was Sunni and Shi’a. Differing theological beliefs had created a volatile geopolitical landscape between Iraq and Kuwait. When Iraq came under a new regime and traditional beliefs had become increasingly common, a distaste for the largely Shi’a Kuwait developed, leading to the invasion of Kuwait. Though this distaste played a significant role, Iraq also wanted to cancel national debt to Kuwait, obtain their refined oil reserves and increase influence in the region. When Iraq had occupied Kuwait, the United Nations responded by imposing trade …show more content…
Iraqi forces had threatened international interests when they had mobilized forces along the Kuwaiti-Saudi Arabian border. Led by the United States, NATO and Arab nation allies had launched Operation Desert Shield to safeguard Saudi Arabia from Iraqi forces. When other nations had observed Iraq further operations near the border, allies collectively had seen that their economic interests were at risk, leading them to using military force. Moreover, this was not an operation to protect Kuwait but a mission to defend Saudi Arabia from Iraqi forces. International allies used refined oil and petroleum imported from Saudi Arabia to sustain industry. Over twenty percent of all petroleum and refined oil imported into the United States was exported by Saudi Arabia. If Iraq were to gain the resources of Saudi Arabia, this would sabotage not only the economy of the United States but also the economy abroad. This would be through Iraq 's manipulation of petroleum prices in the Gulf. Members of the United Nations Security Council did not interpose themselves in Kuwait until Iraq had posed a threat to their interests. Operation Desert Shield led by the United States, NATO members and Arab nations alike did not occur when the invasion of Kuwait first ensued. Only when Iraq had threatened Saudi Arabia did they take action. This means that when Iraq was initially a threat …show more content…
Citizens from a broad spectrum of the international community had been distraught with the Iraqi occupation of kuwait. This had been seen in with political movements in middle eastern allies of Kuwait such as Oman or Pakistan to influence the government to take up arms against Iraq. Maybe this was only due to the differing theological beliefs but it still did display the power of the people. Moreover, it had shown that people had been against the occupation and their ability to voice political opinions. Human rights violations of Iraqi forces had provoked public opinion of international allies. Iraqi forces had explicitly targeted civilians because of varying religious denominations in Kuwait. This had caused international outrage, influencing government foreign affairs decisions involving Kuwait. In addition, this displays how public opinion can sway foreign policy. Global media coverage had influenced people to hold a hostility towards Iraq because of international alignment. News broadcasters such as CNN in the United States or CBC in Canada had covered the occupation of Kuwait, generating a specific bias. The bias, based on international support, had been displayed in national news, influencing public opinion and therefore influencing the government on matters of foreign

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