Political Revolutions In The Philippines

1058 Words 5 Pages
Towards the end of the Cold War, many civilizations sought to free themselves from their dictatorships due to corruption and abuse of power. As a result, various democratic revolutions began to arise, which led to numerous global transformations. On account of technological advances in the media and the importance of respecting human rights, countries, like the Philippines, were able to overcome their ruthless leaders by generating nonviolent movements, eventually resulting in the end of communism. With the influence of the media and the Catholic Church, the Filipino community successfully eliminated the infamous dictator, Ferdinand Marcos, by relying on independent organizations such as JAJA and NAMFREL, and civil disobedience campaigns. …show more content…
Cardinal Jaime Sin was a key figure in the opposition of Marcos’s leadership. In a letter, he gave specific instructions to the people on how to act during the 1986 election. He encouraged the Filipino community to vote by addressing their religious principles. For example, he stated, “Participation in these coming elections is not only a political act, but also an exercise of our Christian faith. We should participate in this electoral process as Christians,” (Sin 1985, 85). In doing so, he made it their moral obligation. Cardinal Jaime Sin also addressed the NAMFREL volunteers. The National Movement for Free Elections was a group formed to watch every polling place in order to avoid any altercations (Kenney 2010, 79). Sin informed them that they had the Church’s full support. In addition, he encouraged other priests to pass on the message to their parishioners. Cardinal Jaime Sin believed there was an “effective nonviolent way to change the structures in the Philippine society,” (Sin 1985, 86). Believing it was the Church’s responsibility to provide moral guidance, their support played a prominent role during the …show more content…
On account of rapid printing technology, news of protests and marches spread through articles, pictures, posters, and other materials. The Catholic Church’s station, RADIO VERITAS, became a huge influence in the expansion of the social movements (Sin 1985, 88). During the civil disobedience campaign, the people were able to stay informed through daily announcements in Radio Veritas and the alternative press (Civil Disobedience Campaign 1986, 91). Throughout the revolution, many viewed the broadcaster, June Keithley, as a symbol of courage (Cariño 1986, 93). The influence of the modern mass media played a key role in unifying society by providing public

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