Political Principles Of The French Revolution

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The French Revolution led to the end of the monarchical system which had governed France and eventually the country was declared a Republic. After the execution of Louis XVI a debate ensued over how best to govern and stabilize the newly minted Republic. It was clear to the revolutionary leaders that creating a balance of power and enforcing the revolution’s principles of ‘liberty, fraternity and equality’ were pivotal to France’s reconstruction. Eventually, power was given to a twelve-member committee of Public Safety (CPS). The Committee of Public Safety, as it became known, constituted what historians call France’s Radical Republic. The policies initially set forth by the Radical Republic attempted to fulfill the principles of ‘liberty, …show more content…
While this seems to be an ideology in opposition to liberty and equality, mayor Chaumette goes on to explains that laws have been passed that promote happiness, but without power these laws risk becoming obsolete. Although Robespierre and Chamuette wanted to enforce the revolutionary principles, it was very hard because they were constantly faced with conspiracies that put their Republic at risk. They think that the only way to ensure that these principles can survive is by becoming temporary authoritarians over the people in an effort to shut out those who oppose them. These ideals were furthered with The Law of …show more content…
This law made it so that no merchant could sell certain materials above a specified price and if they did, they would be subject to a fine. It also put a wage cap on Frances citizens. These laws were meant to last until the end of 1994 and the reason for restricting the liberties of its citizens was to try and create more equality among them. If the gap between the rich and the poor was narrowed and all citizens had access to necessary materials then they would be more inclined to be supportive of the revolutionary cause. The plan for the leaders of the Republic was to grant citizens these liberties once its citizens became in their eyes, more

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