What Are The Advantages Of Rigoberta

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Throughout history, many racial groups have experienced oppression and injustices. Guatemala oppression towards its own indigenous population was one of them. The indigenous communities have suffered inequalities from their own government and from Ladinos. Indigenous people were like slaves to landowners and experienced a lot of injustice in the fincas. In the testimonio of I, Rigoberta Menchú: An Indian Woman in Guatemala Elisabeth Burgos-Debray narrates Rigoberta’s struggles and oppression that many Guatemalan Indian communities have experienced. In Guatemala, historically speaking Ladinos have always dominated indigenous communities and indigenous people have always lived in poverty. The government and Ladinos took advantage of the indigenous …show more content…
Rigoberta witnesses’ numerous injustices and the death of many of her community due to malnutrition, unhealthy work conditions, and the way they have been sabotage allowed Rigoberta to develop a political awareness. However, what trigger her to develop a political consciousness was the exploitation and manipulation experienced by many such as ladinos and the government. The violence and the death of many compañeros and family members allowed Rigoberta to find the courage to move on to help her community. Lastly, her community and culture values allowed Rigoberta to find her political voice. These factors are what allowed Rigoberta to understand the world and herself more clearly, indigenous people have been marginalize and Rigoberta was willing to stop the oppressors by joining the struggle of many compañeros. These events are what allowed Rigoberta to develop a liberation theology and find her inner voice.
Rigoberta and many indigenous

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