Political Impact Of The Civil War

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The U.S. Civil War, composed of many smaller events, was a huge impact in the development of America from post-Civil War to the present day. The war was fought between the North, also called the Union and the South, known as the Confederacy, between 1860 and 1865. After much struggle from both sides, the North eventually defeated the South in 1865. There were many differences between the North and the south, the most well known being the different economies, the citizen’s views on slavery, and the political views of the people in general. Slavery was a huge part of the southern agrarian economy during the Antebellum Era. The southerners depended on slaves to grow and harvest their cotton. The Northern economy was more industrialized and …show more content…
Although there were many factors leading to the Civil War, such as several economic and political standpoints and different views on several issues, the leading cause of the Civil War was the North and South viewing slavery through different political …show more content…
The free states in the North wanted to abolish the spread of slavery to the North and west. During this period, many Northern abolitionists tried to create petitions to congress about freeing all slaves. As time went on more and more petitions were sent to Congress by the Northerners about the abolition of slavery. John C. Calhoun proposed the gag rule, explaining that the NOrtherners would not be allowed to send in but the idea was denied; a different rule, which had similar circumstances, was proposed and carried through instead (Senate Historical Office). Because of their inability to have a say in the government, especially about abolition, the Northerners grew more aggravated with the South. With this antebellum period occurring after the annexation of Texas to the United States many Southerners were trying to bring their slaves west with them. Of course, the abolitionists disapproved of the spread of slavery. One example of their disapproval was the Lemmon Case, which occurred in 1852, freed eight slaves from Jonathan and Juliet Lemmon (Volo, 92). The couple wanted to move and take their slaves west from Virginia to Texas by going through New York then to New Orleans, but everyone was arrested and brought to court. The court deemed the slaves free, and the slaves were even taken to Canada to make sure they were safe from the

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